Maher Law Firm Warns Avandia Users - NY Times Reports - FDA Recommends Recall of Avandia

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According to the New York Times, hundreds of people taking the type-2 diabetes drug Avandia® suffer heart attacks and heart failure as result of its use. For more information, contact the Maher Law firm.

Maher Law Firm attorneys are investigating possible Avandia® claims. Contact an experienced personal injury lawyer – one familiar with Avandia®’s potentially fatal side effects – if you or a loved one has experienced heart problems after Avandia® use.

The article, published in the Friday edition (02/19/2010), cites confidential government reports stating that if Avandia® users were instead treated with Actos, a similar pill, about 500 heart attacks and 300 cases of heart failure would be averted each month.

An internal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) report recommends Avandia®, or “rosiglitazone” be removed from the market. The authors, Dr. David Graham and Dr. Kate Gelperin, both urge Avandia®’s withdrawal.

According to the New York Times, the reports have ignited debate within the FDA as to what to do about Avandia®. While some officials support its withdrawal, others believe more testing is needed.

What is Avandia®?
Avandia®, or rosiglitazone, is a popular prescription drug, manufactured by the U.K. pharmaceutical company, GlaxoSmithKline, used to treat “type-2” or “adult-onset” diabetes.

Avandia® was once one of the biggest-selling drugs in the world. Driven in part by a multimillion-dollar advertising campaign, sales were $3.2 billion in 2006. However, after a 2007 study by a Cleveland Clinic cardiologist linked the drug to heart problems prompting an FDA warning, sales plummeted. A committee of independent experts found in 2007 that Avandia might increase the risk of heart attack but recommended that it remain on the market, and an FDA oversight board voted 8 to 7 to accept that advice.

FDA Urges Patients Not to Discontinue Avandia® Use
The FDA said Monday that for now, patients should not stop taking Avandia® without first speaking with their healthcare professional. Patients should discuss any questions or concerns with their physician. Report any side effects to FDA’s MedWatch program.

Senate: Maker Should Have Warned Patients
Senate investigators concluded that GlaxoSmithKline should have warned patients earlier of Avandia®’s potential side effects. The bipartisan multiyear Senate investigation states GlaxoSmithKline failed to warn patients years earlier that Avandia was potentially deadly.

“Instead, G.S.K. executives attempted to intimidate independent physicians, focused on strategies to minimize or misrepresent findings that Avandia may increase cardiovascular risk, and sought ways to downplay findings that a competing drug might reduce cardiovascular risk,” concludes the report, which was overseen by Senator Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat, and Senator Charles E. Grassley, an Iowa Republican.

Avandia lawyer

Contact an experienced personal injury lawyer – one familiar with Avandia®’s potentially fatal side effects – if you or a loved one has experienced heart problems after Avandia® use.

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