Exclusive: Original Owner of $500K Storage Unit Identified

StorageAuctionCentral.com reports on a new twist in the story of a $500,000 gold coin discovery at a Concord, California storage auction.

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gold coins found at storage auction

Former owner of $500K storage unit identified.

Rigmaiden, a self-described “hacker,” is accused of running a complex identity theft ring that stole more than $4 million from the U.S. government through the filing of fraudulent tax returns.

Contra Costa County, California (PRWEB) November 22, 2011

There’s a new twist in the story of the $500,000 in gold discovered by a bidder at a California storage auction two weeks ago. StorageAuctionCentral.com reports that they were contacted by a man who claims to know the original owner of the storage unit.

On November 8, 2011, Dan and Laura Dotson, of television show “Storage Wars” fame, reported that a bidder at one of their auctions had discovered $500,000 in gold coins after purchasing the contents of a storage unit for $1,100. The coins were described as Spanish doubloons and reported to be at least 200 years old.

After reading about the find on StorageAuctionCentral.com, a man named Curtis P. contacted the news outlet to detail what he knew of the coins’ history. Curtis identified the owner of the gold as Daniel David Rigmaiden, a man who is currently awaiting trial in the United States District Court of Arizona (No. CR-08-814-PHX-DGC) on federal charges of fraud and identity theft. Rigmaiden, a self-described “hacker,” is accused of running a complex identity theft ring that stole more than $4 million from the U.S. government through the filing of fraudulent tax returns.

Curtis relayed that he had met Rigmaiden in jail while being held for unrelated charges and that Rigmaiden asked him to take care of his apartment and storage units. Curtis said he was unable to make payment on the storage units because Rigmaiden had leased them under an alias that had not been disclosed to him.

Curtis described Rigmaiden as a troubled genius whose apartment was devoid of nearly all modern amenities. “The only furniture he had were two tables, a folding chair, and a cot,” said Curtis. Curtis also said that Rigmaiden didn’t spend lavishly and would convert his stolen funds into gold and silver that he would then store away from his home. “He didn’t even have a car,” said Curtis.

Rigmaiden’s case reads like a modern day cloak and dagger novel, complete with undercover FBI and Secret Service operatives and suppression by the federal government of information about a secretive technology known as “Stingray” that is used to track cellular phone locations.

Curtis said Rigmaiden described the storage unit as containing $680,000 in gold, silver, and platinum. A wired.com article on Rigmaiden’s case stated that more than $116,000 cash and $210,000 in gold and silver coins were found when searching Rigmaiden’s home and another storage unit he rented.

More details about Curtis’s claims and Rigmaiden’s case can be found on StorageAuctionCentral.com.

StorageAuctionCentral.com is a leading source of news and information about storage auctions. For more details about storage auctions, or to discuss this article, visit our storage auctions forum.

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