Rethinking the Periodic Table: New Book Explores Scientific Theory about Elements' Physical Structure

For many decades, researchers tried to formulate theories—such as the String Theory—to account for flaws in the Standard Model of the element, whose spherical design could not account for gravity. Jurjen Van der Wal, a structural and mechanical engineer who understands structural design, conceived a universally fitting foundation and drastically new approach to physics in 'Decoding the Periodic Table.'

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After researching [the Periodic Table of Elements], I realized physicists were nowhere near discovering what a proton looked like and how it structurally interfaced with other particles.

Newport Beach, CA (PRWEB) May 19, 2011

Jurjen van der Wal’s scientific theory about the chemical elements reads like a detective story, in which the clues are right in front of our very eyes. As if gazing at a Magic Eye puzzle, he reviewed the Periodic Table of Elements and discovered an undeniable pattern in the elements’ physical structure. In 'Decoding the Periodic Table', van der Wal shares over 20 years of groundbreaking research into the structural design of elements.

“I was always fascinated by the large Periodic Table chart on the wall of the chemistry room, wondering how the individual elements were constructed,” says van der Wal. “After researching, I realized physicists were nowhere near discovering what a proton looked like and how it structurally interfaced with other particles.”

For many decades, researchers tried to formulate theories—such as the String Theory—to account for flaws in the Standard Model of the element, whose spherical design could not account for gravity. Van der Wal, a structural and mechanical engineer who intimately understands structural design, began sketching probable structural models of the elements in the late 1960s. But it wasn’t until 1989 that he conceived the universally fitting foundation for Decoding the Periodic Table, a drastically new approach to physics.

Van der Wal configures the chemical elements of the Periodic Table structurally, complementing the existing Periodic Table. In this structural table, elements of seven structural phases are arranged as building blocks of small, identical cubes that resemble a DNA sequence. The book also theorizes:

  •     An equation for calculating the nuclear mass of a neutron with perfect precision
  •     Helium’s structure serves as the basic building block of all other elements that follow
  •     The inert gas Argon is a major sub-assembly used over and over to construct the periods of Krypton, Xenon and Radon

About the Author:

Jurjen van der Wal was born in The Netherlands in 1929. He became a mechanical engineer and immigrated to Southern California in 1958, designing automobile assembly lines for Chrysler and Ford and executing structural analysis of Boeing’s first 747. Interestingly enough, physics runs in his bloodline: In the late 1700s, his ancestors designed and built a celestial telescope for the King of The Netherlands. His elder brother was a researcher in the physics laboratory of Philips Electronics, where he invented streetlights that use 40 percent less energy.

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