The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and Microsoft Create Partnership to Save Endangered Species According to the IUCN

The IUCN and Microsoft announced at the 2012 IUCN World Conservation Congress in South Korea, the formation of a new partnership to further strengthen the information available on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ to help save endangered species .

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The Sumatran Tiger - an Endangered Species - photo by Craig Kasnoff

The Sumatran Tiger - an Endangered Species - photo by Craig Kasnoff

The IUCN Red List is the starting point for conservation action. Many species have been saved from extinction through conservation programmes based on sound science. Dr. Jane Smart, Director, IUCN Global Species Programme.

Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) October 08, 2012

Microsoft and IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, jointly announced at the 2012 IUCN World Conservation Congress in South Korea, the formation of a new partnership to further strengthen the information available on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™. This collaboration sees Microsoft becoming the first corporate member of The IUCN Red List Partnership.

“The IUCN Red List is the starting point for conservation action. Many species have been saved from extinction through conservation programmes based on sound science,” says Dr. Jane Smart, Director, IUCN Global Species Programme. “The skills and knowledge that Microsoft brings to The IUCN Red list partnership will be invaluable in developing policies and conservation programmes to protect species.”

Full release is here at Endangered Earth News.

The IUCN is the world’s oldest and largest global environmental organization. It was founded in 1948 as the world’s first global environmental organization. Today the IUCN is the largest professional global conservation network in the world and is a leading authority on the environment and sustainable development. The IUCN has more than 1,200 member organizations including 200+ government and 900+ non-government organizations and almost 11,000 voluntary scientists and experts, grouped in six Commissions in some 160 countries.

Conserving biodiversity and protecting endangered species is central to the mission of IUCN, and the IUCN works to demonstrate how biodiversity is fundamental to addressing some of the world’s greatest challenges: tackling climate change, achieving sustainable energy, improving human well-being and building a green economy.

Microsoft Corporation is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Redmond, Washington that develops, manufactures, licenses and supports a wide range of products and services related to computing. The company was founded by Bill Gates and Paul Allen on April 4, 1975. Microsoft is the world's largest software maker measured by revenues. It is also one of the world's most valuable companies.

Specifically, Microsoft will provide a combination of scientific expertise and new technologies to more accurately understand current and future extinction threats to the world’s plant, fungi and animal species, thus enabling better conservation policy frameworks to be devised. This new partnership formalizes work that the two organizations have been exploring together since the International Year of Biodiversity in 2010.

“This century will be defined, not least, by whether we are able to tackle unprecedented global ecological and environmental challenges,” says Professor Stephen Emmott, Head of Computational Science, Microsoft. “This will require NGO’s, Governments, universities and businesses to establish new kinds of partnerships, new kinds of science and scientists, and new kinds of technologies. Our partnership with the IUCN, led by Dr. Lucas Joppa, a leading ecologist based at my laboratory, is a pioneering example of this combination”.

Endangered Earth News was created by Endangered Species Journalist Craig Kasnoff to promote the plight of endangered species and how to save them.

Go here for more information about Endangered Species.

Go here for more information about Endangered Tigers.