iCAALL Report Will Aid Clinicians in Identifying Underlying Causes of Eosinophilic Disorders in Allergic Disease

Four leading allergy organizations propose global consensus on criteria, definitions, terminologies, and classification of eosinophil disorders and related syndromes.

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Hyderabad, India (PRWEB) November 30, 2012

EMBARGO DATE: 7 DECEMBER 2012

Consensus report will aid clinicians in identifying underlying causes of eosinophilic disorders in patients with allergic diseases

Four leading allergy organizations propose global consensus on criteria, definitions, terminologies, and classification of eosinophil disorders and related syndromes

Hayfever (allergic rhinoconjunctivitis) and asthma affect a growing number of people around the world. They are two examples of conditions involving eosinophils (ē′ō-sin′ō-fil, -fīlz), a type of white blood cell that normally protects the body from attacks on the immune system. Too many eosinophils accumulating in specific areas of the body, however, such as nasal mucosa during hay fever, and lungs during an asthma attack, can result in an over-reaction of immune defense in those areas. This can lead to inflammation, irritation, difficulty in breathing, and other problems including tissue and organ damage. In order to help their patients find relief from the symptoms and prevent further complications, physicians look for the underlying causes of these eosinophil increases through blood tests and other diagnostic methods.

To aid clinicians in their efforts to improve the quality of life of patients with eosinophil disorders, a new report entitled, International Consensus (ICON) on Eosinophil Disorders, was released today during the 2nd WAO International Scientific Conference (WISC 2012) of the World Allergy Organization in Hyderabad, India. It is the newest ICON from the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), a joint initiative of the World Allergy Organization (WAO), the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI), the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), and the American College of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

“Although scientific achievements in the field of eosinophilic disorders have led to improved diagnosis and therapy for patients, a global consensus has been needed,” said Lanny J. Rosenwasser, M.D., chair of the ICON on Eosinophil Disorders. “The ICON provides a diagnostic algorithm, along with redefined criteria, terminologies and classifications of eosinophilic disorders, based on the latest developments published in the field and the work of individuals and groups focused on explaining the complexities of eosinophilic disorders. The report will aid physicians in providing treatment for patients that is targeted to the specific type of eosinophilic disorder. It also identifies several unmet needs in this disease area that need to continue to be addressed in a multi-disciplinary way.”

The full report will be published in the December 2012 issue of the World Allergy Organization Journal. To receive a digital copy of the report, please contact the World Allergy Organization at info(at)worldallergy(dot)org or call + 1 414 276 1791.

More information about the latest research to be presented at WISC 2012, being held from 6-9 December, is available at http://www.worldallergy.org/wisc2012.

From the Participating Organizations in the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL):

World Allergy Organization (WAO):

“The eosinophil plays a central role in the defense against parasitic infections, but depending on the underlying disease, eosinophil infiltration and its interactions with other immune cells can lead to significant disease and disability,” said Ruby Pawankar, M.D., Ph.D., the President of the World Allergy Organization. “During the past two decades, several different classifications of eosinophilic disorders and related syndromes have been proposed, but a global consensus is much needed. We believe that this newly developed ICON on Eosinophil Disorders will serve as an important global consensus to better understand and better identify eosinophil disorders, leading to more effective management of patients with these diseases worldwide. Moreover, it addresses several unmet needs.”

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI):

“The ICON on Eosinophil Disorders is an important document for physicians treating these conditions,” said American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) President A. Wesley Burks, M.D., FAAAAI. “Advancing care involves empowering physicians with the latest science. The ICON on Eosinophil Disorders offers a unique global perspective on this science with the ultimate goal of facilitating appropriate diagnosis and treatment choices throughout the globe.”

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI):

“The ICON on Eosinophil Disorders identifies the need for global registries and trials to analyze rare subcategories of eosinophil disorders in terms of incidence, prevalence, disease course, prognosis, and treatment response,” said Richard Weber M.D., the President of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. “Our goal is to raise awareness and understanding of eosinophilic disorders, which include hay fever and asthma, among medical professionals so that patients are diagnosed and managed properly.”

European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI):

Professor Doctor Cezmi Akdis, the President of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), commented that “In light of the increasing burden of hypereosinophilic diseases, this ICON provides an updated global nomenclature and classification of related disorders and conditions. Looking at the whole list of hypereosinophilic conditions suggests that this consorted effort will increase the awareness about hypereosinophilic syndrome, resulting in more competent care for patients by health care professionals and substantially increased allocation of resources for research in this mostly unknown area.”

For more information about this press release and partnership, please contact:

Sofia Dorsano
World Allergy Organization (WAO)
+ 1 414 276 1791
sdorsano(at)worldallergy(dot)org


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