Probiotic Action Responds to an Article Which Reports Alcohol Intake in Relation to Skin Health

Following an article published by Modern Medicine which states that alcohol intake can increase the likelihood of sunburns, a representative of skin care treatment Probiotic Action offers a response.

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Bohemia, NY (PRWEB) December 12, 2012

On December 11, Probiotic Action releases a statement reacting to a recent study that linked alcohol consumption with the depletion of antioxidants in skin.

The article, which discusses the study, published by Modern Medicine stated that “[researchers] at the Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology, University of Berlin, examined the effect of alcohol intake on carotenoid concentration in the skin and whether parallel consumption of a carotenoid-rich drink would counteract the effects of alcohol.”

The three-part experiment studied six Caucasian male volunteers with an average age of 34.5 years. The study found that “[alcohol] consumption significantly reduces the level of protective antioxidants in the skin, leading to faster sun burning.” However it is also noted that “[simultaneously] consuming antioxidant-rich food and drinks may help to mitigate this effect, according to a study.”

Fernando Perez, a spokesperson for Probiotic Action, offers a response to the study. Perez stated that protecting your skin from UV rays and sun burn is one of the most important things you can do to maintain skin health. “Using an effective sun screen – along with the best treatment for acne you can find – can go a long way towards protecting your skin.”

Probiotic Action is an advanced acne treatment that uses a topical probiotic containing the “good bacteria” that is naturally found on healthy human skin. By using probiotics, Probiotic Action is an effective treatment that restores the normal bacteria content on skin. Probiotic Action will successfully clear skin while protecting skin against bad bacteria, free radicals, and pollutants.

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