Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS of The Facial Paralysis Institute Works to Change Society’s View of Patients Afflicted with Facial Paralysis

Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, educates others to break society’s negative view of those suffering from facial paralysis or Bell’s palsy in response to new research titled 'Society's Perceptions of Facial Paralysis.'

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The positive that comes from this study is that therapists will have a better understanding of how outside individuals view those suffering from facial paralysis, which will result in better counseling and management of the disorder.

Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) December 28, 2012

According to a recent study published in The Laryngoscope medical online library, new research surrounding how a person afflicted with facial paralysis is viewed by society was examined. The study found a significant difference in the attractiveness of a person suffering from facial paralysis or Bell’s palsy as opposed to someone who was not. Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, believes that the key to changing society’s image of facial paralysis is through education.

”The research made public through this study proves that we have a long way to go in educating the world about facial paralysis and Bell’s palsy,” said Dr. Azizzadeh, facial paralysis surgeon in Beverly Hills.

The study used forty test subjects who examined photographs of people suffering from facial paralysis and people who were not afflicted with facial paralysis. The study participants then rated the pictures based on attractiveness and were asked to identify the side of the face afflicted with the disorder, as well the feature that was most affected. Upon completion of the research, it was determined that attractiveness scores were significantly lower for individuals experiencing facial paralysis. The study also found that the test subjects were able to identify photographs of those afflicted with facial paralysis quite easily, though determining which side was affected became more difficult.

”The positive that comes from this study is that therapists will have a better understanding of how outside individuals view those suffering from facial paralysis, which will result in better counseling and management of the disorder,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Not only does Dr. Azizzadeh work to educate others about facial paralysis and Bell’s palsy through countless articles and medical journals he contributes to, but also through the Facial Paralysis & Bell’s Palsy Foundation, a non-profit organization founded by himself that aims to provide a positive outlet for sufferers of both conditions as well as their family and friends. The next Facial Paralysis & Bell’s Palsy Foundation support group meeting is slated for Saturday, January 12th at 10:30 A.M. in Orange County, California.

”Getting involved with the Facial Paralysis & Bell’s Palsy Foundation is really a fantastic way to learn about both conditions, whether you’re suffering from one yourself or know someone who is. I want people to understand that there are treatments out there that can provide amazing results and that this condition can be treated with great success,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Since his extensive and prestigious training at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Azizzadeh has helped hundreds of people with varying degrees of facial paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh is the director of the Facial Paralysis Institute and one of the leading figures in the field of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh has been recognized for his work on several occasions and has appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show as well as countless other media outlets. As a trained facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon and head and neck surgeon, Dr. Azizzadeh has a distinctive insight into facial nerve function and facial aesthetics.

For additional information regarding Dr. Azizzadeh or the Facial Paralysis Institute in Los Angeles, please call (310)657-2203 or visit http://www.facialparalysisinstitute.com.


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