What December 21, 2012 Really Meant to the World and the Maya

Author James O'Kon spoke to students about what the date December 21, 2012 has to do with the Maya calendar.

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The 7th Century Bridge was built across the Usumacinta River.

Jim O'Kon on the Usumacinta River bordering Mexico and Guatemala

Now that December 21 has passed and the fear has subsided the world knows a great deal more about the ancient Maya and appreciates their great history and scientific and technological accomplishments.

Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) December 31, 2012

The hysteria surrounding the myth of a disaster on December 21, 2012 had adults and children around the world puzzled and afraid of what might happen on that day. I addressed the students at Galloway School in Atlanta, GA, which my granddaughter attends, concerning the Maya calendar and the real meaning of the end of this cycle of the Maya Long Count calendar. I personally have been researching the Maya for many years and my book The Lost Secrets of Maya Technology talks about that research. I was able to dispel their dark thoughts and fears of the unknown. I described the Maya fascination with time, how they developed their calendar and why the end of one Calendar Round and the start of another occurred on December 21, 2012.

I explained that December 21 is the Maya New Year and what a perfect day it was to cycle the calendar. I illustrated the juxtaposition of the dark rift in the Milky Way with the sun on December 21, which was the winter solstice in 2012. The ancient Maya selected a perfect day for a grand New Year and the start of their new calendar. The modern Maya people believed that this day would bring enlightenment and happiness not disaster.

I exhibited advisories from NASA and from the United States Geological Survey that indicated the lack of a presence of Planet X, asteroids or polar shift. Now that December 21 has passed and the fear has subsided the world knows a great deal more about the ancient Maya and appreciates their great history and scientific and technological accomplishments.

James O’Kon has pursued a lifelong passion for the engineering, sciences and technology of the Maya. In his role as an archaeo-engineer he has combined his unique professional engineering experience with the search for lost Maya technology. After years of collecting field data, obtained by traveling in dugout canoes, hacking his way through the jungle and sleeping in tents, he was able to use his forensic engineering skills, along with modern digital tools, to reveal the mysteries of lost Maya technology.

His discoveries in Maya technology have been recognized by, among other publications, National Geographic Magazine and in a production on The History Channel. He has delivered scientific papers dealing with his discoveries in Maya technologies at international engineering and archaeological symposia and presented his discoveries to the Explorers Club in New York City. His explorations and discoveries of Maya technology have been documented in his book, The Lost Secrets of Maya Technology.