New Study Reveals Frozen Tissue Sampling Provides Greater Insight Into Treatment For Lymphoma of the Parotid Gland

Babak Larian, MD, FACS, comments on new study results indicating that frozen tissue sampling when LPG is suspected in patients will prevent unnecessary procedures and lessen the need for more extensive surgeries

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Babak Larian
When a patient is diagnosed with lymphoma of the parotid gland and the condition is caught early on, proper treatment can provide the patient with very favorable outcomes.

Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) December 28, 2012

In a recent study presented at the International Congress on Salivary Gland Diseases, researchers revealed that using surgical tissue sampling with frozen sections when lymphoma of the parotid gland is suspected is a viable option for determining whether or not additional surgery is required, as LPG is not treated by gland removal. Babak Larian, MD, FACS, and expert parotid surgeon in Los Angeles believes that the new development will improve the surgical process for patients undergoing parotid tumor surgery.

“Using tissue sampling with frozen sections is an important advancement for not only doctors, but patients alike. Because doctors will be able to better determine if LPG is apparent with the help of frozen sampling, the patient will undergo less tissue damage to surrounding areas which ultimately makes recovery much easier,” said Dr. Larian.

Because lymphoma of the parotid gland is exceedingly rare, diagnosing the condition can be difficult. Generally, LPG presents itself as a painless, slow growing mass in the parotid gland, with no symptoms differentiating the disease from a benign tumor. The study, which took place over the course of 16 years, aimed to evaluate the diagnostic process of the disorder and selected 697 patients who underwent surgery due to a parotid tumor. Among those who participated in the study, 246 malignant tumors were found, with only 4% being diagnosed as lymphoma of the parotid gland.

“Because LPG presents itself almost identical to other tumors of the parotid gland, distinguishing the condition from other cancerous or benign parotid tumors becomes difficult,” said Dr. Larian.

The study proved the success of using frozen tissue sampling while the patient is undergoing an open biopsy. As indicated by the research, once an initial mass is found, parotid gland surgeons may use frozen tissue sampling to determine whether or not additional surgery will be required. Should the sampling indicate lymphoma of the parotid gland, further surgery is not required, therefore saving the patient from an unnecessary recovery period and added tissue damage. Additionally, the research indicated that histology is an important factor in diagnosing LPG.

“When a patient is diagnosed with lymphoma of the parotid gland and the condition is caught early on, proper treatment can provide the patient with very favorable outcomes,” said Dr. Larian.

Dr. Larian is a board certified head and neck surgeon with an extensive knowledge of the parotid gland and the successful treatment of salivary gland tumors. Upon completion of his medical schooling at the prestigious University of California—Irvine, Dr. Larian completed a six-year residency program in otolaryngology at the University of California Los Angeles. As the current Chief of Head & Neck Surgery at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, Dr. Larian provides patients with the best care and surgical outcomes possible.

For additional information on lymphoma of the parotid gland or to speak with Dr. Larian, please contact the CENTER for Advanced Parotid Surgery by calling (310) 461-0300 or visit http://www.parotidMD.com


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