Fake Drugs Entering the U.S.: Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Highlight Federal Warnings About Counterfeit Medications

Federal regulators are warning more than 350 doctors and medical practices across the country that the Botox they received from a supplier in Canada does not carry federal approval and is most likely counterfeit. The reportedly fake anti-wrinkle drug, shipped by a company owned by Canada Drugs, does not have the approval of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and therefore the agency can’t guarantee its effectiveness or its safety, according to NBC News.

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Doctors who try to get away with administering fake or unapproved medications to patients need to be held accountable. The FDA needs to pursue companies that try to make these products available in the United States aggressively.

Marlton, NJ (PRWEB) December 28, 2012

Federal regulators are warning more than 350 doctors and medical practices across the country that the Botox they received from a supplier in Canada does not carry federal approval and is most likely counterfeit. The reportedly fake anti-wrinkle drug, shipped by a company owned by Canada Drugs, does not have the approval of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and therefore the agency can’t guarantee its effectiveness or its safety, according to NBC News. The report is the fifth of its kind in 2012 where the FDA issued a warning about drug manufacturers operating outside the country. In New Jersey, injury attorney Richard P. Console Jr. stresses the need for medical professionals to heed these warnings and avoid administering dangerous drugs to patients.

“Healthcare professionals and hospitals have a duty to use approved medications when treating patients,” he said. “Knowingly using a counterfeit drug or failing to inspect medication properly, puts patients at risk for additional injuries and could lead to malpractice actions down the road. Certainly, Botox is no compound to mess around with if you’re not absolutely sure it’s safe.”

The FDA reportedly commented that Canada Drugs has been at the center of shipping of other unapproved or counterfeit medications in 2012. In February, the FDA targeted shipments of the cancer drug Avastin made by Canada Drugs when it warned 19 healthcare providers in the United States of possible counterfeiting. The federal regulator also ordered the shutdown of 4,100 websites later in the year for selling unapproved medications to consumers in the United States, according to published reports. Many of those sites were reportedly operated by agents of Canada Drugs, says NBC News.

Counterfeit drugs may contain dangerous substances that alter the potency of medications, which can lead to higher-strength or ineffective doses. Console, whose firm of medical malpractice attorneys has been helping accident victims obtain compensation since 1994, has seen the dangers of prescription pharmaceuticals in the injuries his clients have suffered.

“Prescription pharmaceuticals are dangerous enough without attempting to use counterfeit copies of approved medications,” he said. “Doctors who try to get away with administering fake or unapproved medications to patients need to be held accountable. The FDA needs to pursue companies that try to make these products available in the United States aggressively, and it appears they’re being proactive. Multiple warnings issued against the same company in a single year would leave me to believe there’s more that could be done to stop the behavior.”

Console & Hollawell P.C. is a personal injury law firm helping victims of medical malpractice in New Jersey. The firm’s attorneys have secured more than $30,000,000 in deserved compensation for their clients, including those affected by deadly prescription drugs.

http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/12/24/16128177-fda-warns-doctors-of-counterfeit-botox?lite