Whole Foods & Safeway Top Greenpeace’s Seafood Sustainability Scorecard; Winn-Dixie, Publix Sink to the Bottom of the List

Greenpeace today released its 2012 Carting Away the Oceans (CATO) report, which evaluates and ranks supermarkets on their sustainable seafood policies. This year’s report reveals the dramatic leaps in rank made by industry leaders, as well as the continued unsustainability of the bottom-feeders.

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“Safeway and Whole Foods have transformed themselves into true industry leaders,” says Senior Markets Campaigner Casson Trenor.

Washington, DC (PRWEB) May 02, 2012

Greenpeace today released its 2012 Carting Away the Oceans (CATO) report, which evaluates and ranks supermarkets on their sustainable seafood policies. This year’s report reveals the dramatic leaps in rank made by industry leaders, as well as the continued unsustainability of the bottom-feeders.

Greenpeace’s CATO report has evaluated supermarket sustainability since 2008, and up until this year no retailer had earned a green rating. This year, for the first time, the CATO report features two retailers--Safeway and Whole Foods--that have earned green ratings, vaulting them to the top of the list.

The ratings evaluate retailers using a variety of factors---including the sale of “red list” seafood, engagement with conservation initiatives, transparency of supply, and the establishment of cohesive internal policies--to score each retailer on a scale of 0-10.

“Safeway and Whole Foods have transformed themselves into true industry leaders,” says Senior Markets Campaigner Casson Trenor. “There is certainly still more work to be done, but we celebrate the achievements of these companies and eagerly await similar actions from other retailers posed to embrace sustainability to a greater degree.”

Of the twenty featured supermarkets, Harris Teeter, Aldi, and Delhaize also showed significant movement toward sustainability. Publix and Winn-Dixie (now owned by BI-LO) continue to rank at the bottom, as they have in each year the CATO report has been released.

“Today, people in most cities across America have the option to buy seafood from a retailer working to ensure their products are sustainable,” Senior Oceans Campaign Director John Hocevar said. “There is no longer any need to shop at companies which refuse to take responsibility for the seafood they sell.”

The CATO report is the product of heightened consumer awareness of the destruction caused by certain seafood items, as well as sustained advocacy by environmental groups.

“Supermarkets are one of our strongest connections to the oceans,” Mr. Trenor says. “United States consumers buy about half of their seafood at the fish counter, and conservation efforts have often concentrated on the individual shopper. Unfortunately, there is rarely enough information available for consumers to be able to choose sustainable options—rather, the supermarkets themselves must take responsibility and ensure that what they sell is sustainable.”

For further information:
The 6th Carting Away the Oceans report will be available here on May 2. For a preview copy of the report, or to arrange an interview with author Casson Trenor, please contact Travis Nichols (tnichols(at)greenpeace(dot)org, 206.802.8498)


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  • Travis Nichols
    Greenpeace
    206.802.8498
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