Myths About Red Wine "Miracle" Molecule Debunked: Scientific Community Continues Resveratrol Debate

Scientists continue to debate the merits of resveratrol, the so-called "miracle molecule" found in red wine, according to Heather Hausenblas, Ph.D., of the University of Florida College of Health and Human Performance.

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Research shows that resveratrol may help increase metabolism in overweight adults, help increase cellular energy production and support a healthy cardiovascular system.

Gainesville, FL (PRWEB) May 22, 2012

Scientists continue to debate the merits of resveratrol, the so-called ‘miracle molecule’ found in red wine, according to Heather Hausenblas, Ph.D., of the University of Florida College of Health and Human Performance. Numerous studies suggest that resveratrol has potential for a wide array of applications. However, media attention around a few conflicting studies and accusations of fraud against one researcher loom over the tiny molecule’s formerly grand image.

There are numerous scientific studies on the health benefits of resveratrol. “In my opinion, the majority of the science behind resveratrol is sound,” says Dr. Hausenblas. “Research shows that resveratrol may help increase metabolism in overweight adults, help increase cellular energy production and support a healthy cardiovascular system. My opinion hasn’t been swayed one bit. I still believe that a high quality resveratrol supplement is the way to go, preferably one that uses organic grapes.”

News of health benefits from red wine may encourage some to simply drink more, but it may not be that simple. According to Dr. Hausenblas, “You would have to drink about a thousand glasses of wine to get the same amount of trans-resveratrol as one 250mg capsule of a high quality resveratrol supplement.”

Even though resveratrol is touted as the "red wine antioxidant," the most popular commercial source of resveratrol is Japanese Knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum), a wild vine native to Asia. Many resveratrol supplements are simply Japanese Knotweed extract. Dr. Hausenblas disagrees with this practice. “In my opinion, the best resveratrol supplements include the whole grape as well. This provides antioxidant plant nutrients called polyphenols. That’s why ResVitále uses organic red wine grapes from southern France as part of its formula,” she says.

In addition to her research and teaching responsibilities at the University of Florida, Dr. Hausenblas serves as a scientific advisor and consultant to ResVitále, the manufacturer of a line of naturally sourced, resveratrol-based supplements sold exclusively through General Nutrition Centers (GNC).

If you would like more information about this topic, or to schedule an interview with Dr. Hausenblas, please call Andy Mauldin at 877-787-5454 or email Andy at amauldin(at)resvitale(dot)com.


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