Convention & Visitors Bureau Promotes Farmington as Base Camp for Exploring the Four Corners

As the summer travel season begins, both National Geographic and the Lonely Planet have singled out the Four Corners as a destination for geotourists and adventure travelers. The Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau is responding to the increased interest with providing new information on archeological and geological sites in the area on its website and at its visitor information center.

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Traveling the wide open spaces of the Four Corners

“Farmington is an excellent place for adventure seekers returning from a day of travel through the remote back country of the Four Corners,” says Tonya Stinson, Interim Manager of the Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau.

Farmington, NM (PRWEB) June 04, 2012

“Farmington is an excellent place for adventure seekers returning from a day of travel through the remote back country of the Four Corners,"says Tonya Stinson, Interim Manager of the Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau. She quickly lists the advantages for using Farmington as a hub to explore the region. “We have the essentials covered, moderately priced, three-star hotels, local restaurants and popular chain eateries. We are the best place, often the only place, to repair a car, an RV, a motorcycle or a bike.”

In the vast and scenic area around Farmington are impressive attractions, some known worldwide, some still waiting to be discovered. Farmington is an easy drive to: Canyon de Chelly National Monument with its beautiful red rock canyons opening to green fields is 150 miles west of Farmington on the Navajo reservation. Mesa Verde, a huge park with gorgeous cliff dwellings and interesting museums, is 80 miles to the north. Chaco Canyon, a world heritage site, once the center of the ancient southwestern Pueblo peoples, is an engineering marvel 75 miles south of Farmington.

Striking geologic wonders within an easy drive include Monument Valley150 miles away on the Utah, Arizona border, the iconic Shiprock 30 miles west of Farmington and the eerie hoodoos of the Bisti Badlands 43 miles south on Hwy. 371.

North, in the San Juan Mountains, a 45 minute drive from Farmington, is the Durango Silverton Narrow Gage Railroad a popular family attraction with train rides daily between the two beautiful mountain towns, Durango and Silverton.

In Farmington’s outskirts are Aztec Ruins National Monument with an impressive reconstructed kiva and Salmon Ruins an archeological site with a research library specializing in the archaeology and history of the American Southwest. Salmon Ruins also offers personalized guided tours of many ancient ruins in the area.

After a day of touring, entertainment options in Farmington include an outdoor theater in the Lions Wilderness Park. Sandstone Productions, a professional regional theater company, is presenting Fiddler on the Roof in the amphitheater for the 2012 summer season.

Tour options, maps, brochures, and detailed visitor information on the Four Corners are available at the Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau website and at the Gateway Park Visitors Center and Museum at 3041 E. Main Street in Farmington.