Don’t Leave Home without Carol Fenster’s Top 7 Items for Gluten-Free Travel

Savvy gluten-free travelers always carry crackers, dried fruit, and nuts in case gluten-free food isn’t available but Carol Fenster, an expert in gluten-free living and author of Gluten-Free 101, carries additional items to make sure she has safe food while enroute and at her destination.

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Gluten-Free 101: Easy, Basic Dishes without Wheat by Carol Fenster

“Travel can be safe and enjoyable when gluten-free travelers are prepared with safe food that transports well, especially for those times when food choices are limited,” says Fenster.

Denver, CO (PRWEB) July 23, 2012

Savvy gluten-free travelers always carry crackers, dried fruit, and nuts in case gluten-free food isn’t available but Carol Fenster, an expert in gluten-free living and author of Gluten-Free 101, carries additional items to make sure she has safe food while enroute and at her destination.

Fenster, whose travels have taken her around the world―despite her gluten-free lifestyle―selects these items so that they pass airport-security screenings, are non-perishable, and are substantial enough to make a light meal, if necessary. “There’s nothing worse than being away from home and hungry,” says Fenster. “Whether traveling for business or pleasure, with these items in a purse or carry-on gluten-free travelers are always prepared for airport delays, long plane rides, or destinations that lack gluten-free options.”

Nut Butters.
Individual-serving packets of nut butters. Tear one end open and squeeze the packet to distribute the nut butter on apples, carrots, or gluten-free crackers―with no need for a knife.

Beef Jerky.
Fenster chooses gluten-free versions and carries a few sticks in a plastic, resealable bag. Chewy, filling, yet non-perishable, they can make a small, but high-protein meal.

Oatmeal.
Individual-serving packets of gluten-free rolled oats, in plain or flavored versions. Pour into a paper cup designed for hot beverages, add hot water, and let stand (covered) for a few minutes to reconstitute the oats. Some airport concessions serve ready-to-reconstitute paper cups of oatmeal, but Fenster cautions that these may not be made with gluten-free oats.

Granola.
Whether home-made or store-bought, granola can be eaten as trail mix (just add nuts and candy bits), as a breakfast cereal, or sprinkled on yogurt. Always verify that it is made with gluten-free oats. Fenster carries a small bag to eat enroute, with additional bags in her suitcase to eat throughout the trip.

Bread.
Fenster packs a couple of gluten-free bread slices into a child’s sandwich box (the kind shaped like a slice of bread). The rigid sides protect the bread from being crushed as well as keep it fresh longer. The bread can be toasted, used in sandwiches, or eaten with nut butter. If possible, she then buys a loaf of gluten-free bread at her destination and keeps a couple of slices with her at all times (storing the rest of the bread in a hotel room refrigerator).

Fenster, the author of ten gluten-free cookbooks, says that these foods may be purchased in natural food store and some supermarkets. In addition to these foods, however, Fenster also carries some small, but essential non-food items to facilitate eating at her destination.

Immersion heater.
Immersion heaters are small coils attached to electrical cords. When plugged in to an electric outlet, the heated coil rapidly heats the water in a cup or bowl. Ideal for use in hotel rooms, the hot water can be used for oatmeal, hot tea, dry soup mixes, or any food item that requires hot water.

Toast-it bag.
Reusable, plastic bags that allow toasting a slice of bread or a grilled cheese sandwich in a toaster without risk of contamination from residual bread crumbs. The bags are washable and made of a special silicone-treated material that allows the heat to penetrate through to the bread while in the toaster slot, without burning the plastic bag.

“Travel can be safe and enjoyable when gluten-free travelers are prepared with safe food that transports well, especially for those times when food choices are limited,” says Fenster.