Type Resources Reveals New Way to Gain Control of One's Destiny Using Jung's Eight Cognitive Functions

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Type Resources leads in applying Jung's eight functions in an innovative way to fully engage the mind. This new approach uses all eight functions to define what is most important in one's life and to manage one's activities so as to achieve what is most important.

Using C.G. Jung’s eight cognitive functions or function-attitudes as a tool to focus one’s life or daily activities and maintain that focus will be the mark of one's success.

"Using C.G. Jung’s eight cognitive functions or function-attitudes as a tool to focus one’s life or daily activities and maintain that focus will be the mark of one's success," says Bob McAlpine, president of Type Resources.

To begin the process, one needs to start with the cognitive function Jung named introverted feeling. Introverted feeling is used to decide what is important by evaluating how well a potential focus aligns with one’s core values. The question to ask is, “What is really, really important to me?” This should be followed with introverted thinking to define what is important in a way progress and achievement can be measured. Once the answer to this question is finalized, the next cognitive function to engage is extraverted sensation. Extraverted sensation is concerned with current activities, so the questions to ask are “Are my current activities supporting what is important to me?” and “What opportunities am I missing to do things that would support what is important to me?” One should follow extraverted sensation with introverted sensation to identify how supportive past behaviors have been relative to what is most important. The questions to ask are, “What have you been doing that supported what is important to you?” and “What have you been doing that did not support what is important to you?” One should follow introverted sensation with extraverted intuition to explore possible activities that might be supportive by asking, “What might or could I do in the future that would support what's important to me?” Introverted intuition should then be called upon to answer the question, “Of the activities available now, which one is most supportive of what one is trying to achieve?” Once a person has determined what activity to do, the person should use extraverted thinking to answer the question, “What are all of the tasks I must accomplish if I am to complete this activity as effectively and efficiently as possible?” Next one should engage extraverted feeling to answer the question, “How does working on this activity affect everyone else in my life?” and “How do I explain my focus so they will be supportive?”

Engaging these eight cognitive functions or function-attitudes in these way at multiple levels and on a regular basis keeps one focused on what is most important and it identifies the best use of a person's time at any moment.

To learn more about the cognitive functions, attend Type Resources web series beginning on September 11, 2012. Each two hour session is only $97. Attend the entire series and save 25%.

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Bob McAlpine

Vicky Schaefer
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