Study Links Single Occurrence of Traumatic Brain Injury to Alzheimer’s

There have recently been some major strides made in understanding what predisposes individuals to developing Alzheimer’s and the findings suggest that head trauma may be one link. The Journal of Neuroscience recently published a study that linked a single occurrence of traumatic brain injury with significantly raising an individual’s chance of having Alzheimer’s. The Pennsylvania personal injury attorneys at Console & Hollawell believe these findings will greatly benefit those who have sustained a brain injury in an accident as many times “minor” traumatic brain injuries such as concussions are not taken seriously enough.

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This study demonstrates that their injury can worsen over time and that they may be at an increased risk to then develop Alzheimer's on top of the pain they have already endured.

Marlton, New Jersey (PRWEB) October 01, 2012

There have recently been some major strides made in understanding what predisposes individuals to developing Alzheimer’s and the findings suggest that head trauma may be one link. The Journal of Neuroscience* recently published a study that linked a single occurrence of traumatic brain injury with significantly raising an individual’s chance of having Alzheimer’s. The Pennsylvania cyclist accident attorneys at Console & Hollawell believe these findings will greatly benefit those who have sustained a brain injury in an accident as many times “minor” traumatic brain injuries such as concussions are not taken seriously enough.

Traumatic brain injury refers to an injury in which normal brain function is disrupted by a bump, jolt, or blow to the head. These injuries are seen often with accidents such as motor vehicle accidents, bike accidents, and slip-and-falls. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),** nearly 36 percent of all traumatic brain injuries arise from falls and more than 17 percent are the result of a traffic accident (car, truck, motorcycle, pedestrian, or bicycle).

Each year, an estimated 1.7 million Americans sustain a traumatic brain injury, according to the CDC.*** The CDC also explained that traumatic brain injuries are a contributing factor for nearly 31 percent of all injury-related deaths in the country.

The study specifically investigated the presence of two key changes in the way the brain operates in both traumatic brain injury victims and those who suffer from Alzheimer’s. The study suggests that the presence of these changes in both Alzheimer’s patients and brain injury victims illustrates that brain injuries are one of the strongest environmental risk factors for the development of the degenerative disease.

Attorney Richard P. Console, Jr. expressed that this study could make a major impact on the lives of those who have suffered a brain injury.

“Traumatic brain injuries already can cause a lot of pain and suffering to the victim,” he explained.“They already have many hardships facing them and this study demonstrates that their injury can worsen over time and that they may be at an increased risk to then develop Alzheimer’s on top of the pain they have already endured.”

This study further asserts the necessity for accident victims that may have suffered a brain injury to ensure that they are fully examined by a medical professional. Early detection of this type of injury could greatly benefit the victim.

The Pennsylvania personal injury lawyers at Console & Hollawell have dedicated their careers to protecting the rights of accident victims, including those who have suffered a traumatic brain injury. An experienced brain injury lawyer can explain to victims what their legal rights and options are when they have sustained this type of injury.

** http://www.cdc.gov/TraumaticBrainInjury/causes.html

***http://www.cdc.gov/TraumaticBrainInjury/statistics.html