Tibet Travel Permits Restriction and Application Guidelines in 2013

Tibet travel permits are common sources of confusion for travelers planning a tour of Tibet. Tibet Ctrip Travel Service-TCTS (http://www.tibetctrip.com), a Lhasa based travel agency, has released updated information on the permit application process and what travelers need to do to help ensure a hassle-free experience.

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Tibet travel permits and visa application, reliable and firsthand information from local Tibet travel agency www.tibetctrip.com

Tibet travel permits and visa application, reliable and firsthand information from local Tibet travel agency www.tibetctrip.com

Can I get a permit for sure? No hesitate to contact local tour agency in Lhasa now!

(PRWEB) June 20, 2013

Tibet travel permits are common sources of confusion for travelers planning a tour of Tibet. Sometimes travelers must have a variety of permits, in addition to the travel permit required to enter Tibet, to visit places like Mt. Everest or Mt. Kailash. It’s quite understandable that some travelers may be put off, confused, or intimidated by all of these requirements. The reality is that Tibet travel agencies are required by Chinese law to apply for permits on travelers’ behalf, eliminating much of the need for worry and confusion. Tibet Ctrip Travel Service-TCTS (http://www.tibetctrip.com), a Lhasa based travel agency, has released updated information on the permit application process and what travelers need to do to help ensure a hassle-free experience.

  •     At least three weeks before a travel group’s Tibet tour arrival, Tibet travel agency TCTS will request a scanned copy of the passport information page and Chinese visa page for each traveler in the group. If travelers already have their passport and Chinese visa before tour booking, it is better to send photo copies of the passport and Chinese visa via email attachment for agency to get permits approval. The Tibet tourism bureau requires that these documents be included with the application.
  •     The Tibet permit application takes from 7-10 days.Travelers arriving from mainland China need to present the permit when they check into their flight or board the train to Lhasa. TCTS will have the permit delivered to the hotel travelers are staying in prior to travelling in Tibet. TCTS does not mail permits internationally so travelers will need to stay in China at least one night before coming to Tibet. Travel groups coming from Nepal will meet one of TCTS’s guides at the border. Travelers will not have to worry about keeping the permit after entering; their guide is required by law to retain possession of the permit at all times.
  •     Permits are now being issued to groups of any size. However, due to Tibet travel temporal regulations, travelers from Norway may not be able to enter Tibet in summer 2013 and one permit may not cover multiple nationalities. It may be possible to obtain permits for each individual; details will be provided at the time of booking. Also journalists, members of foreign militaries, and diplomats may require special permission to enter Tibet.

Providing the information requested, within an appropriate time frame, is key to having a hassle-free experience. Any additional permits that may be required for a traveler’s tour will be taken care of by TCTS. Tibet tourism regulations may seem confusing; however, travel agencies like TCTS are knowledgeable and experienced in navigating the application process. These regulations may change at any time without any advanced notice; this is beyond the control of any Tibet travel agency. In the event of a sudden change TCTS will be more than happy to help travelers change their itinerary or provide refunds of tour expenses paid, travelers’ flexibility and understanding is appreciated. With the Tibet travel season coming into full swing, travelers are encouraged to begin planning their trip now.

Devin Moore provided this news release above on behalf of local Tibet tour agency TCTS (tibetctrip.com). Devin is a travel writer and independent economic analyst based in Springfield, Missouri USA. His economic research is currently focused on airfare pricing. Devin Moore works to spread awareness of Tibet and its people through publishing Tibet travel information.