Rethink Your Resolutions: Rose Cottage Press Reveals Three Surprising Indulgences that Support Good Health

Resolve to drink more coffee, eat more chocolate and have that glass of wine. From the new book-”Hope I Don’t Die Before I Get Old” published by Rose Cottage Press - http://www.BeforeIGetOld.com

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Indulging Could Be The Healthiest Thing You Do All Year!

“Moderation is a fatal thing. Nothing succeeds like excess.”
Oscar Wilde

Nashua, NH (PRWEB) January 03, 2013

In this season of resolution writing, drastic measures are often undertaken in the name of building a better life–belt tightening after a holiday shopping spree, diets to counterbalance rich festive fare, or buckling down to work because vacation time is over. No wonder so many folks find the long winter months depressing! Is all this restraint really a good idea? Research now shows that some indulgence is actually a good thing.

Too good to be true? Here are the top three healthy indulgences proved by recent studies to keep support a long and happy life, so go ahead and indulge.

Coffee
Finally there is proof that a morning mug of bliss–aka coffee, is good for you after all. Women who drink a cup or more of coffee daily have up to a 25 percent lower stroke risk than those who don’t indulge, according to a new study reported in the journal Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

"Coffee is incredibly rich in antioxidants, which are responsible for many of its health benefits," says Joy Bauer, RD, nutrition and health expert for Everyday Health and The Today Show. Caffeine may play a role in it’s health benefits but decaf also packs a healthy punch. Try darker roasts for a more robust experience with fewer side effects. Regular coffee drinkers have less chance of getting diabetes, skin cancer, cavities, Parkinson's disease, breast cancer, heart disease and head and neck cancers as well.

Chocolate
In a ten year study that concluded in April 2012 (Australian Diabetes, [Obesity and Lifestyle study researchers found that of the 2013 participants, those who consumed dark chocolate with a polyphenol content of 500+mg daily, significantly reduced both total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The effect of a daily dark chocolate regimen could prevent 70 non-fatal cardiovascular events and 15 cardiovascular related deaths per 10,000 people annually.

Considering that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, a small investment (an estimated $42.00 per year) in “the Food of the Gods” could pay off very well. The study concluded that “Chocolate benefits from being, by and large, a pleasant and hence sustainable treatment option.”

Wine
The latest, greatest research about the health benefits of wine comes from a [twin study done in England. The study proved that a glass of red wine per day increased bone building osteoblasts and immediately began to strengthen bones. The abstaining study participants had a decrease in bone density, but were able to quickly rebuild by adding glass of wine per day to their diet–results showed up within 24 hours!.

Don’t worry, white wine lovers also have benefits. According to a [study by the University of Buffalo white wine helps support lung function. The study showed superior lung function in those who enjoyed 2-5 glasses per week.
Drinking wine also boosts the function of the pancreas and reduces the level of glucose, lowering risk for diabetes.

Go ahead and resolve to indulge regularly–it could be the healthiest thing you do all year.

Looking for a way to get all the anti-oxident power of chocolate without the calories? Check out this video recipe for low calorie hot chocolate

About Rose Cottage Press
"Hope I Don't Die Before I Get Old" by Tracey Bowman, clinical teacher at the Yale University School of Midwifery and Mary Boone Wellington, CEO of Rose Cottage Press and Chairman of LightBlocks inc., is an upbeat book that takes on the hard issues of caregiving, delivering sound advice to a generation dealing with ever increasing lifespans, their own and their parents.


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