Naming Objects Quickly and Correctly Gets Harder from One's 50s

New research published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society shows naming things quickly and accurately gets harder from our fifties.

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New York, NY (PRWEB) January 04, 2013

A study of adults from the ages of 25 to 70-plus revealed that our ability to spontaneously and accurately name common objects starts to decline when we hit our 50s and accelerates throughout our 60s and 70s.

Researchers Clémence Verhaegen and Martine Poncelet from the Department of Psychology at the University of Liège, Belgium, tested the naming skills of a group of adults over 3 to 3½-year intervals.

The tests, conducted in French, included naming pictures of objects, deciding if numbers were odd or even and making connections between similar words. The researchers measured both how accurately the study subjects carried out the tasks and how quickly they completed them.

The results, reported in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, published by Cambridge Journals on behalf of the International Neuropsychological Society, show that participants in their 50s, while able to name objects as accurately as people in their 20s and 30s, showed a decline in how fast they could come up with the names compared with younger people. Adults in their 60s and 70s were both slower to find the correct words and also more likely to give objects the wrong name.

Martine Poncelet said: “We found that a subtle decline in naming ability starts to happen in our 50s when it takes us longer to name objects, although we can still name them accurately. This weakening of connections throughout the language system then starts to gather pace in our 60s and 70s when we begin to be poorer at both giving objects the right name and doing it quickly.”

Clémence Verhaegen added: “We don’t yet know why this happens – it may indicate changes in our language abilities only or it may be caused by physical factors that have nothing to do with language. More studies are needed to reveal what is really going on.”

For the full article, please go to http://journals.cambridge.org/jinsnaming

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

For further information, please contact Hannah Gregory on +44(0)1223 325544 or email press(at)cambridge(dot)org

About the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (JINS)

JINS is the official journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, an organization of over 3,700 international members from a variety of disciplines. The editorial board is comprised of internationally-renowned experts with a broad range of interests. JINS publishes empirically-based articles covering all areas of neuropsychology and the interface of neuropsychology with other areas, such as cognitive neuroscience.

For further information about JINS, go to: http://journals.cambridge.org/JINS

About the International Neuropsychological Society

The International Neuropsychological Society was founded in 1967 and is dedicated to bringing together scientists from all scientific disciplines that contribute to the understanding of the brain. The Society currently has more than 3,700 members throughout the world.

For further information about the International Neuropsychological Society, go to: http://www.the-ins.org

About Cambridge Journals

Cambridge University Press publishes over 300 peer-reviewed journals, including journals published on behalf of over 100 learned societies, which form the latest in research and discovery across a range of topics. Many of these journals are the leading academic publications in their fields and together they form one of the most valuable and comprehensive collections of research available today.

Across the world, Cambridge Journals are available in print and online – keeping scientists, researchers, and scholars abreast of crucial developments in research.

For further information, go to: http://journals.cambridge.org


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