Change Management Expert Marianne Carlson Recommends S.I.M.P.L.E. Goals

Change Management expert, Marianne Carlson, uses the acronym S.I.M.P.L.E. to help leaders understand and remember some important attributes of any goals for major organizational change.

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Marianne Carlson, Change Management Expert

Marianne Carlson, Change Management Expert

The SMART goal formula is still helpful, especially when setting personal goals, but organizational goals require a more complex strategy that takes the SMART formula and adds some new criteria.

Orlando, Florida (PRWEB) January 10, 2013

In the latter part of the 20th century, leadership development experts touted the value of setting S.M.A.R.T. goals. The acronym stood for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely (or some variation on that theme). But in 2013, Change Management guru, Marianne Carlson suggests a different approach for setting goals for organizational change. She recommends leaders concentrate on setting S.I.M.P.L.E. goals.

“The SMART goal formula is still helpful, especially when setting personal goals,” Carlson explains, “but organizational goals require a more complex strategy that takes the SMART formula and adds some new criteria.” According to Carlson, organizational goals should indeed be specific, measureable, attainable, realistic and timely, but there are other attributes that must be considered when setting goals that affect an entire organization. She uses the acronym S.I.M.P.L.E. to help leaders understand and remember the following important attributes of any goals for major organizational change.

  •     Strategic. The goals set by leaders of organizations need to reflect the overall vision and mission of the organizations, and they need to move the organization closer to the ideal set forth in the mission statement.
  •     Incremental. Organizational goals are generally set to encompass larger projects, and Carlson recommends breaking them down into smaller, [incremental goals, each with its own plan of action and its own rewards for success.
  •     Managed. Organizational goals are often developed from a leader’s personal vision, but they must be managed by a team of people if they are to be fully achieved. Without a coalition of managers who are willing and able to direct people to action, few organizations will be successful in implementing the leaders’ goals.
  •     Popular. At the onset, very few change projects are met with popular approval from the many people who will have to work to achieve them. But those people will have to be motivated to accept and embrace the leader’s vision, or getting them to implement major changes will be difficult if not impossible. Therefore, a leader must assure that the goals gain popular support in the early stages in order to create buy-in and reduce resistance to the proposed changes.
  •     Literal. Goals should be committed to paper and expressed in very precise terms so that there can be no misunderstanding as to the direction the leader wants to take the organization.
  •     Enough. In today’s fast-changing business environment, it’s no longer sufficient to create goals for the foreseeable future. In order to remain competitive into the future, a leader needs to anticipate requirements and trends, and [set goals that are big enough, bold enough and risky enough to carry the organization forward even as the environment continues to evolve.

About Marianna Carlson:

Marianne is a leader in helping businesses and professionals strategically plan and implement change and transcend difficult corporate transitions. She the author of Ten-Fold Marketing: Growing Your Business by Growing Your Heart, and is also an accomplished speaker and corporate trainer. When change presents problems, Marianne presents solutions. Find out more at http://emcie.com/mariannecarlson/.


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