Ankin Law Office Exposes the Hidden Perils of Restaurant Work

A comprehensive report released by workers' compensation attorneys reveals shocking statistics on the hazards that restaurant workers face daily and offers them step-by-step advice on how to find justice after an on-the-job injury.

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Ankin Law

Frying oil spills can cause third-degree burns. A meat slicer in a deli can lop off a fingertip. A restaurant’s kitchen can be just as dangerous as a factory floor.

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) January 17, 2013

Restaurants supply over 12.9 million jobs in the U.S. alone, and according to an in-depth report released today by workplace injury attorneys at Ankin Law Office those jobs are full of hazards, from razor-sharp kitchen knives to 700-degree ovens. The purpose of the report is to raise awareness about these dangerous conditions and to offer advice for restaurant workers on how to get justice after an injury.

“When people think of workers' compensation cases, they imagine factory jobs and construction work,” says Howard Ankin, attorney and owner of Ankin Law. “But the restaurant industry is just as hazardous. Frying oil spills can cause third-degree burns. A meat slicer in a deli can lop off a fingertip. A restaurant’s kitchen can be just as dangerous as a factory floor.”

According to the report, most restaurant workers’ injuries fall into one of five categories: sprains and strains (42%), lacerations and punctures (17%), burns (8%), fractures (7%) and skin disorders (1%). Cooks are the most likely to be injured on the job (24%), and waiters and food preparers (15% and 9%) follow close behind. Unfortunately, the effects of these injuries can last long after the accident is over, especially when unsanitary conditions lead to infections and other complications.

“The average cutting board has 200% more bacteria than a toilet seat,” Ankin says, “and restaurant ice cubes can contain more germs than restaurant toilet water. When an open wound is exposed to these conditions, something as simple as a superficial cut can become deadly.”

In addition to the statistics on restaurant hazards and injuries, the report also offers step-by-step advice that workers should follow to protect themselves from on-the-job accidents and to find justice when they do occur.

“We tell victims to take photos of their injuries and of the scene, to collect the names of witnesses and to file an official report when an accident occurs,” Ankin says. “These steps help us build a case later, and the more cases we win, the safer the restaurant industry becomes.”

To read the full report and access a code that lets you repost and share the infographic online http://www.ankinlaw.com. To schedule an interview with Howard Ankin, email alaynafrankenberry (at) gmail (dot) com


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  • Alayna Frankenberry

    4128050444
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