Landmark Data Scientist Study Reveals Benchmarks to Guide Hiring & Retention

Benchmarks of analytics professionals yielded from Study offer guidance and insight into analytic talent hiring & retention practices. Four functional roles emerge within analytics teams.

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International Institute for Analytics

The emergence from the data of these four functional roles reflects the progression and growth the analytics community has been experiencing - says John Elder, CEO, Elder Research, and IIA Faculty Leader.

Portland, Oregon (PRWEB) January 23, 2013

The International Institute for Analytics & Talent Analytics, Corp. announced the findings and implications of the 2012 Analytics Professional Study, a joint research study completed to better understand the unique characteristics of analytics professionals and data scientists.

The goal of the study was to provide businesses with data-supported guidance around what makes today’s analytics professionals tick. Over 300 analytics professionals completed the survey, most of whom were eager to understand what patterns would emerge within the community.

The study revealed that analytics professionals are attracted to jobs that give them the opportunity to apply their natural curiosity to solve complex problems, as opposed to financial incentives.

“This analytic talent study has many useful insights about analytics professionals and what they actually do”, says Gregory Piatetsky, KDnuggets editor. “Anyone with curiosity - a key trait of data scientists - should see it.”

Study participants were asked to allocate how they spend their time across eleven areas: Analysis Design, Data Acquisition & Collection, Data Preparation, Data Analytics, Data Mining, Visualization, Programming, Interpretation, Presentation, Administration and Management. Four important functional clusters emerged from the results: Data Preparation, Programmer, Manager and Generalist.

“The emergence from the data of these four functional roles reflects the progression and growth the analytics community has been experiencing” says John Elder, CEO, Elder Research, and IIA Faculty Leader. “Knowledge of these ‘clusters’ should greatly benefit the hiring, retention and management of analytic talent.”

To review the findings and implications of the study for analytics hiring practices, a study summary is available.

About IIA
The International Institute for Analytics (IIA) was created to bring a common organizing language and ‘experienced-based’ research to the growing business analytics industry. Research is organized by vertical industry and organizational role. IIA’s mission is to meet the research and decision-support needs of business and analytics leaders and their teams as the focus on analytics as a competitive differentiator increases. Learn more at IIAnalytics.com

About Talent Analytics, Corp.
Talent Analytics leads the charge to include people in business optimization efforts. Quantified talent traits (as 11 numbers) can be used as an additional data set included in predictive models and to generate highly customized, analytics-driven, talent content embedded in enterprise software to increase human engagement. Learn more at TalentAnalytics.com.


Contact

  • Patty Caron
    International Institute for Analytics
    508-202-1522
    Email