Wall Street Fraud Watchdog Warns All Investors About Forex Trading Educational Schemes-Why Spend Thousands When You Can Buy $20 Dollar Book-Especially Given Todays World

The Wall Street Fraud Watchdog is warning high net worth individuals, or investors to be extremely skeptical about what appears to be a boom in Forex training classes that cost thousands of dollars; especially given how volatile the Foreign Exchange Currency marketplace can be. The Wall Street Fraud Watchdog says, "Why go to a seminar for a couple of days for close to $10,000, when you can get the same information in a book for less than $20 bucks; especially in a world as crazy as the one we find ourselves in today?" http://WallStreetFraudWatchdog.Com

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Going to a Las Vegas casino, and betting your life savings on one blackjack game might be a better investment

(PRWEB) January 28, 2013

The Wall Street Fraud Watchdog is in the investor protection, and due diligence business, and the group is warning high net worth individuals, or investors to not spend two cents on a Forex training class, unless they really understand what they are investing in, and unless they get the part about the Foreign Exchange Currency Marketplace, and extreme volatility. The Wall Street Fraud Watchdog says, "All of a sudden we have been flooded with calls about are these Forex training classes worthwhile, or worth in some cases close to $10,000, and we are saying buy a good book related to Forex investing instead. These books typically cost around $20, to $30 dollars. We cannot emphasis how volatile this type of investing can be. Going to a Las Vegas casino, and betting your life savings on one blackjack game might be a better investment. http://WallStreetFraudWatchdog.Com

So what has the Wall Street Fraud Watchdog so opposed to risky investments like Forex, and or even the US Stock Markets? The group says, "We appreciate Wall Street is looking good at the moment. However, we also believe we have a sitting US President with no coherent foreign policy when it comes to Iran's nuclear weapons ambitions, Iran's financial, and military support of the Assad regime in Syria, that according to UN estimates has already slaughtered 60,000 of their own people, the formerly banned Muslim Brotherhood now controlling Egypt, and according to the Wall Street Journal now persecuting Coptic Christians , Syria's 40 chemical weapons facilities, Islamic terrorist groups attempting to take over North Africa, Chinese aggression with Japan over a few islands that actually do belong to the Japanese, Chinese aggression with Vietnam over their territorial oil reserves in the South China Sea, and on, and on. Does this really sound like a year where an investor could make a killing in the Foreign Exchange Currency Marketplace? How can an investor have any confidence in a currency market, or markets, when there is so much global risk on the table?" http://WallStreetFraudWatchdog.Com

When it comes to investing in the Foreign Exchange Currency Marketplace, global stock markets, or even commodities the Wall Street Fraud Watchdog believes investors must understand the economic atmospherics, and their relationship with global political atmospherics. The group says, "We watch global events very closely, and sadly with no meaningful US foreign policy, or global leadership from the US, we are risk adverse, and suggesting investors buy something inflation proof like silver, or oil futures, and sit this one out. According to the New York Times, on the week of January 14th 2013, President Obama's selection for Secretary of State made the following comment, quote, Senator John Kerry said he will do his best to implement "President Obama's vision for the world, by giving "a voice to the voiceless? How is this vision working out for the 60,000 dead Syrians, a Israel that according to the Jerusalem Post, feels abandoned by a sitting US President, or the Coptic Christians in Egypt that are being persecuted by the Muslim Brotherhood?" http://WallStreetFraudWatchdog.Com


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