Protection from Debt Collection Scams

Scambook, the top online complaint resolution platform, is offering advice to consumers on how to protect themselves from debt collection scams. Fake collection agencies use similar schemes that Scambook has recognized studying the complaints filed through their system.

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Scambook

Fake debt collectors present themselves very professionally and call from official-sounding companies. We want to protect consumers by educating them on signs to spot these fraudulent debt collectors.

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) January 28, 2013

Scambook, the top online complaint resolution platform, is offering advice to consumers on how to protect themselves from debt collection scams. Fake collection agencies use similar schemes that Scambook has recognized studying the complaints filed through their system.

“Fake debt collectors present themselves very professionally and call from official-sounding companies. We want to protect consumers by educating them on signs to spot these fraudulent debt collectors,” says Kase Chong, Director of Marketing at Scambook.

The following questions and tips will grant consumers the opportunity to protect themselves:

First, Scambook recommends consumers to ask themselves the following questions:
1.    Does this loan sound familiar? If so, has it been paid?

2.    Is the caller asking for too much personal information such as social security numbers or bank information?

3.    Do they want a money transfer payment through Western Union?

4.    Are threats of jail time, legal actions or even physical violence being made?

If The Answer Is Yes…
1.    Don’t give the caller any personal information. Consumers have rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act that protects from threats and distributing any personal information over the phone.

2.    Get information from the caller. Ask for the caller’s name, name of their supervisor, location, and their phone number in case legal action needs to be pursued.

3.    Check finances independently. Review bills to check for overdue payments and contact a creditor regarding loans. A financial institution can review any records, provide information about balances and payments owed, and find out if representatives have been trying to get in contact.

4.    Report the call! File a complaint on Scambook or report the call to the FTC or State Attorney General. If the caller is threatening, call the police.
Lastly, Debtors Have Rights

Debtors have rights to protection, such as the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, that limits debt collectors from harassing them. The FTC declares that it’s illegal for a debt collector to use obscene language, threaten, or publish debtors’ names on a delinquency list. They also cannot make false statements about their identity or the amount of money owed. For a complete list of rules and regulations that govern debt collection agencies, check out the FTC’s page.

About Scambook

Scambook is an online complaint resolution platform dedicated to obtaining justice for victims of fraud with unprecedented speed and accuracy. By building communities and providing resources on the latest scams, Scambook arms consumers with the up-to-date information they need to stay on top of emerging schemes. Since its inception, Scambook has resolved over $3 million in reported consumer damages. For more information, visit scambook.com.


Contact

  • Judy Dixon
    PMBC Group
    (310) 777-7546
    Email