Montgomery Educational Consulting Suggests Considerations for Taking AP Classes

As high school students begin signing up for next year’s courses, many are contemplating taking Advanced Placement (AP) classes. Sara Zessar of Montgomery Educational Consulting provides reasons for and against taking these classes.

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Students need to give considerable thought to what courses they should take. They need to weigh the pros and cons of taking AP classes and make the decision that is right for them.

Denver, CO (PRWEB) February 13, 2013

Around the country, high school students are gearing up to register for next year’s courses, if they haven’t done so already. Among the courses they will consider, many students see taking AP classes as a no-brainer.

Sara Zessar, a Senior Associate with Montgomery Educational Consulting explained, “AP courses look good on college applications, help students prepare for college-level work, and enable them to earn college credit, depending on they do on an end-of-year test.” There are additional reasons for taking AP classes, as described in Ms. Zessar’s recent blog post.

Yet AP classes also have drawbacks, and students often are not aware of these. For instance, colleges are making it increasingly difficult for students to earn college credit from AP exams. Perhaps the most extreme example of this is Dartmouth, which recently announced it would no longer give students any credit for AP.

While no other college has yet made such a policy change, many highly selective colleges only allow students with a good AP exam score to take a more advanced course in the subject, rather than giving students credit for the score itself.

The reason for Dartmouth’s decision, and an argument that college professors frequently make against AP, is that the courses simply aren’t as rigorous as college courses. Another argument, one that has been made by high school educators, is that AP courses place undue stress on students.

Some schools limit the number of AP classes students can take; others have gone so far as to eliminate the classes altogether and to offer advanced-level, teacher-designed courses instead. For more on the downside of taking AP classes, see Ms. Zessar’s second blog post on the topic.

Ms. Zessar advised, “The bottom line is that students need to give considerable thought to what courses they should take. They need to weigh the pros and cons of taking AP classes and make the decision that is right for them.”

From offices in Colorado and New Jersey, Montgomery Educational Consulting offers comprehensive, personalized educational counseling services to students locally, around the country, and around the world. These college admissions experts guide students every step of the way as they navigate the university search and application process. Then, they help students get admitted to the college that is right for them.

For more information about Montgomery Educational Consulting, call 720.279.7577, or email info(at)greatcollegeadvice(dot)com. Or visit http://greatcollegeadvice.com.


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