HistoWiki Obesity Curator Asks Government and WHO May Say More Potassium, But Is Less Sugar a Better First Step?

Government experts often say "eat less of this" and "reduce consumption of that tasty thing". A recent news story departed from that consensus (albeit with a warning about eating less of many people's favorite ingredient, salt).

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It would be far better for governments and trusted media sources to focus on 1 thing at a time. If people replace their sugar consumption with natural foods they'd get better results faster.

Austin, Texas (PRWEB) February 13, 2013

The WHO (World Health Organization) and the USDA made news recently by recommending more Potassium. But is this the best place to start improving public health?

Expert Clint Evans says "I've seen much research showing Potassium as one of the 3 key minerals our body's need to cover the functional needs. Too little creates big problems. Once the functional needs are covered the excess supply can be used so we can perform closer to our optimum levels or even 'be our best'."

People are refreshed to see news stories saying to 'eat more' or 'get more of this' instead of the tired old hand-slap don't eat this mantra.

"A far bigger problem is the excess consumption of sugar. Ever since the 70's when western governments put out the food pyramids with carbs and grains as the foundation obesity has soared. It would be far better for governments and trusted media sources to focus on 1 thing at a time. If people replace their sugar consumption with natural foods they'd get better results faster. Once they've got their sugar consumption to about 25 grams per day then they could focus on getting more potassium."

HistoWiki.com's mission is to be the leading social media curation forum where innovative content leaders examine and archive their topics of expertise and passionate interests. For more information about preventing Obesity, call Curators Clint Evans at (512) 508-8935 or contact him via his "Clint Evans Google Plus profile. In addition to being an author, Clint Evans and E. Calvin Barber II are involved in consulting, publishing, coaching, and community service to help decrease obesity and childhood obesity. Their online community site is Hip Chick Fitness.


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