John Lennon Wanted to Drill a Hole in his Head, According to Astonishing Documentary Film

Documentary film “A Hole In The Head” reveals a little-known elite subculture of intellectuals and entertainers who believe that drilling holes in their skulls expands consciousness.

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A Hole In The Head

The members of The Beatles were relaxing together when Lennon seems to have spontaneously suggested that they should have holes drilled into their heads. “Now this wasn’t a joke,” McCartney recalls.

New York, NY (PRWEB) February 24, 2013

A documentary by filmmaker Cevin Soling investigates the ancient practice of trepanation -- the boring of holes into the skulls of living people (presumably for their benefit) -- and examines the claims of trepanation’s modern advocates who believe the procedure improves brain function and leads to “higher consciousness”. The film, titled ‘A Hole In The Head’, reveals a little-known subculture of trepanation devotees who attribute increased energy, creativity, and intelligence to a simple perforation in their skulls.

Bart Hughes, a former medical student from the University of Amsterdam and the grandfather of modern trepanation, recounts on film meeting with John Lennon in the 60s.

Hughes, already having bored a hole into his own skull with a basic drill, was approached by Lennon who told of his desire to open up his own “third eye”. Hughes advised that Lennon needed no such intervention. “Third eye people are your kind of people,” Hughes told Lennon. Because of Lennon’s creative talents and the fact that a small percentage of the population has a metopic skull with a naturally formed hole, Hughes deduced, “there’s no doubt about it, you [already] have the hole.”

Lennon was unconvinced. “He kept wanting it,” Hughes remembers, “and I kept contradicting him.”

An interview with Paul McCartney further recounts Lennon’s strange desire. According to the film, the members of The Beatles were relaxing together when Lennon seems to have spontaneously suggested that they should have holes drilled into their heads. “Now this wasn’t a joke,” McCartney recalls, “this was like, Let’s go next week, we know a guy who can do it and maybe we could all go together.”

“I said, look, you go and have it done, and if it works, great. Tell us all about it and we’ll all have it,” McCartney is quoted in the film.

Trepanation is the earliest known surgical procedure ever developed, and evidence of its practice can be found among our most ancient of ancestral remains in the neolithic era, according to experts consulted in 'A Hole In The Head'.

Though the reasons for ancient trepanation aren’t always immediately clear, explains Dr. John Verano, Physical Anthropologist at Tulane University, the idea that holes were opened in the skull to release demons “may have been true in Europe at a certain time period”, but it’s certainly not the universal rationale that was applied historically.

Though “A Hole In The Head” carries the disclaimer that it in no way endorses the activities of the subjects in the film, could this ubiquitous practice -- with its apparent universal human appeal -- be poised for a comeback with the modern rationale of increasing brain-blood volume?... or is the revival already here?


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