Johnson City Folk Festival 2013 Adds National Guitar Competition, Revels In Promoting Unknown Artists, Expects More National Exposure For Submissions in 2013

The Johnson City Folk Festival adds The Chet Atkins Guitar Competition to the Schedule and intensifies its search for unknown and undiscovered music acts to showcase. The Johnson City Folk Festival is establishing itself as the premier festival for emerging musical artists in the folk and Americana genre.

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The Original Theatre

One of the best festival experiences... great acts, so much fun and so well run. Thanks, JCFF!!

Mike Shanks
Premier Talent, NYC

Johnson City, TN (PRWEB) March 19, 2013

The Johnson City Folk Festival 2013 brings out the hog callers, gospel wailers, moonshiners and mountaineers, pickers, twangers, singers, belters and harpers...

What started as a small local folk music festival is on track to become the premier folk festival of its kind, carefully hewing to it's simple objective: to become a touchstone for undiscovered Folk and Americana artists from around the Nation and Americana singers and songwriters from around the World.

So far, so good.

The Johnson City Folk Festival was started in 2010 and is in its third year. It generally presents between 50-90 acts in four days, and has had a storied and controversial history almost from the beginning, not unlike Bonnaroo or The Boston Folk Festival. In November of 2011, after numerous venue challenges from local fire and building officials, the venue chosen was denied permits and closed at the last minute.

Within three hours a new venue had been selected, the stages, audio gear and seating moved that evening in a furious cyclone of activity and the first year's Johnson City Folk Festival was a tremendous success - 50 acts, 7,000 visitors.

Now with a new venue and outside support, an experienced staff and professional management, the Johnson City Folk Festival is looking carefully at other successful festivals such as Bonnaroo, while preparing for the 2013 season with renewed enthusiasm and purpose. A venue has been identified and will be announced in September.

This year will feature The Chet Atkins Guitar Competition, and all entrants will be asked to perform two Chet Atkins pieces - one mandatory, the other is the players choice - and one original composition influenced by Chet Atkins. There is no entry fee, and the winner will have exclusive bragging rights for one year.

To be selected to appear at The Johnson City Folk Festival, all artists and performers are required to submit an application, which is available at the Johnson City Folk Festival website. Vendor and sponsorship application packages will be available later in the year.

The applications are reviewed by the Music Programmers, the four days' performers are selected, notified and booked by August, 2013. The Johnson City Folk Festival usually begins the first week in November. This year, 2013, the festival dates are November 7, 8, 9 and 10.
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The Johnson City Folk Festival, Inc. © 2013, All Rights Reserved. The Johnson City Folk Festival and The Chet Atkins Guitar Competition are protected by respective trademark and copyright laws. The Johnson City Folk Festival can be reached at 202-255-1995, All correspondence should be directed to Johnson City Folk Festival, 1067 Fearrington Post, Pittsboro, NC 27312


Contact

  • Ron Moore
    Marketing Technology Group
    212-824-2900
    Email

Attachments

This 2012 poster for the JCFF will be available this year JCFF 2012 poster

This 2012 poster for the JCFF will be available this year


JCFF Poster for 2011 JCFF Poster for 2011

The first series of posters for the 2011 Folk Festival


the 2011 t-shirts the 2011 t-shirts

Very popular 2011 t-shirts will be available


The Georgetown Film Festival Theatre The Georgetown Film Festival Theatre

Beautiful, re-purposed Festival Theatre


Buttons from 2012 Buttons from 2012

Buttons were everywhere in 2012