Doctors Health Press Reports on Study: Low-Protein Diet Could Slow Down the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

Doctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study finding that a low-protein diet may help to slow down the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Doctors Health Press Reports on Study: Low-Protein Diet Could Slow Down the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

Reducing This May Slow Alzheimer’s.

Boston, MA (PRWEB) March 01, 2013

Doctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study finding that a low-protein diet may help to slow down the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

As Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/brain-function-articles/reducing-this-may-slow-alzheimers) notes, a health breakthrough in mice has found that Alzheimer’s disease tends to slow down when a low-protein diet is used. This could mark one dietary method of helping thwart this rising health concern.

As the article “Reducing This May Slow Alzheimer’s” reports, the mice had advanced stages Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia. After the new diet, the mice showed improved cognitive abilities in memory tests, and they had less damaged protein in the brain, known to accumulate in Alzheimer's patients.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article explains that dietary protein helps regulate a growth hormone, “IGF-1,” which is linked with aging and diseases that include cancer and diabetes.

When a person is young, IGF-1 helps the body grow. But in the twilight years, it is linked with disease. The researchers wanted to explore dietary ways to prevent or treat these diseases, as opposed to taking serious drugs that manipulate IGF-1. In addition, the article reports that there are no drugs at the moment that work in this way, meaning it could be 15 years or more before one is developed.

According to the article, this new study shows that low-protein intake may also protect the brain against degeneration. It reduced levels of IGF-1 in the body by between 30% and 70% by
using a particular protein to block IGF-1 activity.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article concludes by noting that clinical trials on people are now needed to see if protein-restricted diets are worth it for those with cognitive impairment.

While Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin notes that this is something a person can go ahead and try in any event, this diet needs to be monitored by a doctor or dietician to ensure one does not become deficient in amino acids. Foods with lower levels of protein in them include vegetables, fruit, pasta, potatoes, and bread; foods higher in protein include meat, fish, dairy products, and eggs. Anyone attempting a low-protein diet should also consider asking their doctor about taking any specific supplements.

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs, and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various alternative remedies, including Traditional Chinese Medicine. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press’ views on Traditional Chinese Medicine, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/chinesemedicine.

Source: “Low-protein diet slows Alzheimer's in mice,” University of Southern California, February 14, 2013.


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