Raising Humanity, Changing Perspective in New Poetry Book

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Former teacher David Meyerhof writes collection of poetry to inspire others and raise level of humanity

I want my poetry to change the world. I want to raise the level of humanity of the people of the world and help them realize that they can overcome difficulties in their lives.

Can something as simple as poetry change the world? That is former middle school teacher David Meyerhof’s goal with his new book, “Look Beyond,” a collection of sixty poems that aim to inspire people to raise their level of humanity and persevere to overcome adversity. His verses highlight universal human emotions and experiences that highlight how we are all the same.

“I want my poetry to change the world. I want to raise the level of humanity of the people of the world and help them realize that they can overcome difficulties in their lives,” he says.

Meyerhof’s perspective is shaped by his family’s remarkable past. Both of his parents are Holocaust survivors who escaped from Germany. The lessons from his parents have shaped his feelings about humanity and the importance of respect for all people.

His poems also speak to the importance of continuing to push through when circumstances seem to be against you. Meyerhof’s poetry will help readers realize they can overcome adversity, even when their circumstances seem impossible. His poems focus on perseverance and fighting through challenges and will encourage people to keep going and empower themselves.

Meyerhof says, “My father said, ‘One person can make a difference in this world.’ I hope I can be that person, too.”

“Look Beyond”
By David Meyerhof
ISBN: 978-1-4771-4404-6 (sc); 978-1-4771-4405-3 (hc); 978-1-4771-4406-0 (e)
Softcover, $12.99
Hardcover, $15.99
Ebook, $3.99
Approximately 70 pages
Available at http://www.amazon.com and http://www.barnesandnoble.com.

About the author
David Meyerhof is a retired middle school teacher who taught thirty-three years in the Los Angeles Unified School District. He lives with his wife of 33 years in Burbank, California. His parents escaped from Germany and survived the Holocaust. David’s grandfather, Otto, won the 1922 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovering the relationship between oxygen consumption and the metabolism of lactic acid in muscles.

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Karen Hurt
Bohlsen Group
317-602-7137
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