All About Learning Press Provides Tips for Teaching Dolch Sight Words

Only 10% of the words on the Dolch List need to be taught as sight words—90% of the words are decodable through systematic phonics

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"Dolch Sight Words" "All About Spelling"

All About Spelling - Easy to Learn, Easy to Teach

The All About Reading and All About Spelling programs teach the Dolch Sight Words in the easiest and most effective way possible.

Eagle River, WI (PRWEB) March 11, 2013

Due to the Common Core reading foundational standards, many schools have placed an increased emphasis on teaching sight words in the elementary grades, and the Dolch Sight Word List is commonly used. Developed in the 1930s by Edward William Dolch, the list contains 220 high-frequency words such as this, see, and up. Because Dolch intended for children to memorize the words as a whole, many of today’s teachers are under the assumption that Dolch Sight Words are non-phonetic and must be taught as sight words. But the truth is that 90% of the Dolch Word List is completely phonetic.

The All About Reading and All About Spelling programs teach the Dolch Sight Words in the easiest and most effective way possible. Instead of teaching all 220 words as sight words, author and curriculum developer Marie Rippel reorganized the Dolch words into logical categories. Instead of introducing sight words as outlined by the Dolch list—with complex words like yellow taught at the pre-primer level and simple words like sit taught in third grade—the All About Reading and All About Spelling programs teach only one new concept at a time and each lesson builds on the previous lesson. When sorted according to their phonetic structure, 90% of the words on the Dolch list can be easily taught through systematic phonics. This leaves only 21 words—just 10%—that break the rules and need to be taught as sight words.

Published by All About Learning Press, Inc., All About Reading and All About Spelling are award-winning programs that are based on the Orton-Gillingham approach and the latest research. Lessons are multisensory and students learn through sight, sound, and touch while using letter tiles, flashcards, activities, comprehension exercises, and decodable readers. The lightly scripted "Open and Go" lesson plans require no previous teaching experience, and these complete and comprehensive programs come with lifetime support and a 100 percent money-back guarantee.

For more information on these effective programs for teaching reading and spelling, visit http://www.AllAboutLearningPress.com/.


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