Arm the Flight Attendants? Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Talk about Issues Surrounding New TSA Security Standards in Airports and Airplanes

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will allow pocketknives, souvenir bats, and sports equipment as carry-on items beginning in April, a sharp change from security standards in place after the events of September 11, 2001, according to a March 2013 article published by CNN. Attorney Richard P. Console Jr. confronts the issue surrounding airplane security in his article, “Blades on a Plane.”

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Having bladed weapons of any kind on aircraft potentially jeopardizes the well-being of everyone aboard. I think we may be forgetting the terrible events that got us here in the first place in allowing people to bring weapons onto flights.

Marlton, NJ (PRWEB) March 18, 2013

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will allow pocketknives, souvenir bats, and sports equipment as carry-on items beginning in April, a sharp change from security standards in place after the events of September 11, 2001, according to CNN. Flight crews and passengers alike are up in arms over the relaxed standards, prompting many to question how the decision could improve safety onboard U.S. flights. Attorney Richard P. Console Jr. confronts the issue surrounding airplane security in his article, “Blades on a Plane.” He believes the TSA’s move could expose airlines to greater liability, and lead to increased tensions in an already tight space.

“Safety in a confined space like an airplane cabin is the most important component of air travel,” said Console. “Having bladed weapons of any kind on aircraft potentially jeopardizes the well-being of everyone aboard. I think we may be forgetting the terrible events that got us here in the first place in allowing people to bring weapons onto flights. That kind of short-sightedness can lead to serious injuries, and a host of liability questions in the future.”

Console takes a closer look at budget concerns at TSA and the record of the agency at discovering contraband items before they make it past security checkpoints. He presents data culled from the TSA’s own records and news articles to show there are already holes in security, including a recent gaff at Newark Liberty International Airport, reported by ABC News and other national media outlets, where screening agents missed an undercover TSA official carrying a mock bomb.

Read More: http://www.consoleandhollawell.com/law-blog/blades-on-a-plane-why-the-tsa-cares-more-about-mouthwash-than-passenger-safety