New Study Suggests Preoperative Mapping of Facial Nerve in Cerebral Aneurysm Patients May Reduce Risk of Developing Muscle Palsy

Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, shares his expert opinion surrounding newly developed preoperative percutaneous mapping and discusses the benefits of the strategy.

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Dr Babak Azizzadeh MD

For patients who do not recover from facial paralysis after one year, treatments including the masseteric-facial nerve transfer and cross-facial nerve graft with gracilis muscle flap have really created a significant positive impact.

Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) March 21, 2013

In a new study published in the National Library of Medicine, a successful new approach involving pre-operative percutaneous mapping pertaining to surgery surrounding cerebral aneurysms was examined. According to Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, and director of the FacialParalysis Institute in Beverly Hills, the new advance could greatly reduce the number of patientswho experience post-operative muscle palsy, also described as temporary facial paralysis.

“With the testing completed in the study, I have no doubts that this could potentially reduce the number of patients who have trouble with facial paralysis following treatment for a cerebral aneurysm. Doctors will now have a better understanding how to identify high risk patients before operating,” said world-renowned facial paralysis surgeon Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS.

In the study, mapping of the frontal facial nerve branch was completed in 52 pre-operative patients who eventually underwent supraorbital keyhole approaches for aneurysmal clipping. Of the 52 individuals, 11 experienced varying degrees of muscle palsy with all returning to normal function within 2-5 months. The study determined that patients with the highest risk of developing post-operative palsy indicated mapping exclusively at one centimeter from the line measured in the supraorbital margin.

At the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills, world-renowned facial paralysis expert Dr. Azizzadeh successfully helps individuals overcome facial paralysis should they not recover from the condition on their own. In the case that a patient should seek treatment to improve muscle palsy as a result of a supraorbital keyhole approach to treat a cerebral aneurysm, Dr. Azizzadeh often finds that a procedure called the masseteric-facial nerve transfer highly effective. In this procedure, Dr. Azizzadeh is able to suture the masseter nerve to the paralyzed facial nerve to bring neural input to the facial muscles, improving function and promoting facial reanimation.

“For patients who do not recover from facial paralysis after one year, treatments including the masseteric-facial nerve transfer and cross-facial nerve graft with gracilis muscle flap have really created a significant positive impact,” said Dr. Azizzadeh. "The ability to regain smile movement is among the best I've ever seen using these two procedures."

Dr. Azizzadeh is trained in Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, as well as Head & Neck Surgery, giving him a distinctive insight into facial nerve function and facial aesthetics. Dr. Azizzadeh also has extensive training in microsurgical facial reconstruction, which is often required for the treatment of people who are born with facial paralysis. With the reputation as the leading expert in his field, Dr. Azizzadeh has been recognized as a Top Doctor by the US News & World Report and completed a fellowship in facial plastic & reconstructive surgery at the prestigious Harvard Medical School.

For additional information regarding the Facial Paralysis Institute in Beverly Hills or for a schedule of support group meetings, please contact Dr. Azizzadeh by calling (310) 657-2203. Additional inquiries may be made by visiting: http://www.facialparalysisinstitute.com/.


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