The Center for Family Farm Development, Inc. Will Petition The White House for Black American Farm Relief

On the 14th anniversary of the historic Pigford vs. Glickman consent decree (Civil Action No. 97-1978), the Center for Family Farm Development, Inc. (CFFD) will launch a campaign to break through political gridlock denying full implementation of a $117 billion federal settlement with 45,000 Black American farmers. The campaign goal is to attract 100,000 petition signatures in support of a request for a Presidential Executive order that will effectively end race discrimination in US Department of Agriculture loan programs.

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CFFD's petition requests formation of a public-private partnership to manage a legacy trust....which will repay the government within a decade, leaving a permanent, private agricultural loan capacity for future farm development in the Black Belt South.

Decatur, GA (PRWEB) April 05, 2013

On April 14, 2013 the Center for Family Farm Development, Inc. (CFFD) will launch a campaign to attract 100,000 petitioners to deliver $117 billion in production loan relief awarded to Black American farmers in the Pigford vs. Glickman consent decree, April 14, 1999 (Civil Action No. 97-1978). These farmers, who won the 1999 race discrimination lawsuit against the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in federal court are still being denied justice by the USDA, which was given responsibility for implementing the settlement process.

The White House will give policy review status to petitions containing at least 100,000 signatures within thirty days of the petition launch. George Harris, CFFD Chairman/CEO, made the announcement during worship services at the Fort Valley First Seventh-day Adventist Church, mere blocks away from Fort Valley State University, and historical hub of agricultural information for Black American farmers in Georgia.

CFFD’s petition will request an Executive Order from President Obama which forms a public-private partnership to manage a legacy trust, accounting for production loans while generating interest on principal. This legacy trust will repay the government fully within a decade, leaving an unprecedented permanent, private production loan capacity for future agricultural development in the Black Belt South. By this means George Harris claims, “Only in the United States of America may Black farmers use market means to feed their own families and fund their own dreams.”

Harris is an Elder in the Fort Valley Seventh-day Adventist Church where doctrinal emphasis on healthy food consumption is a benchmark. The Fort Valley First Seventh-day Adventist Church is one of 177 Black American congregations in the South Atlantic Conference of Seventh-day Adventist Churches in Georgia, North and South Carolina. Diet related disease rates are, according to most analyses, higher, and in Type 2 diabetes rates, epidemic, among Black Americans. Harris said, “Connecting the dots between:

  •     race discrimination in US farm policy;
  •     urban food deserts where fresh produce is readily not readily available, yielding
  •     higher rates of diet related diseases in the Black American community;

merely requires full implementation of the Pigford consent decree as an Adventist Doctrinal next correcting step”.

Recognizing the scale of imminent economic transformation beginning in Black Belt Georgia, South Atlantic Conference President, William Winston, has offered Adventist Information Technology services and direct access to Adventist ministries to laymen, health, religious liberty and community services. The Petition Campaign will use these means, as well as Facebook and other social media, to attract at least 100,000 petitioners to sign the petition at whitehouse.gov. before the deadline of May 13, 2013.

For more information on the petition and to lend support for private development of Black Belt Family Farms, visit http://www.centerforfamilyfarmdevelopment.com.

About the Center for Family Farm Development, Inc.:
CFFD, Inc. is a non-profit community development corporation founded in 1986 by George E Harris, Jr. Its mission is to create markets for Black American farm products.

Contact the Center for Family Farm Development, Inc.:
Telephone: 404-378-3803
George E. Harris, Jr. Chairman/CEO: georgeh70(at)comcast(dot)net