LeaseQ Offers Tips to Business Owners on Handling Evergreen Clauses

Evergreen clauses are designed to keep customers committed to an agreement beyond the original term. An equipment leasing provider explains the concept and how to avoid it.

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Evergreen clauses may be worded any number of ways, but they do share common characteristics, and create serious hurdles to be overcome before the agreement can be nullified.

Boston, MA (PRWEB) April 01, 2013

LeaseQ, one of the leading providers of business and commercial equipment leasing and financing in the United States, is warning business owners against what has commonly become known as the “evergreen clause”, commonly found in many leasing and financing contracts. Evergreen clauses basically allow the lease term to automatically renew at the end of the lease, unless one party or the other provides notice to the other of their intent not to renew, usually no less than 30 days before the end of the current term.

Evergreen clauses may be worded any number of ways, but they do share common characteristics, namely that they keep the contract active longer, and do provide a mechanism, however nebulous, for ending the agreement. They may also create serious hurdles to be overcome before the agreement can be nullified.

Evergreen clauses are designed to benefit the one providing the service, but can become a headache for the person receiving the service. This is due to the fact that most people simply do not review lease agreements months or years into the term. The clause sneaks up and is in effect before anyone is aware of it.

Evergreen clauses should be identified and agreed to only for very good reason, such as the locking in of a given price or rate. In most cases, they are best avoided, with simple refusal to sign unless the clause is removed. In many cases, lining it out and initialing where it was done will be enough to void the clause.

If for whatever reason, it is impossible to avoid the evergreen clause, then evoking the clause is the single best method of protection. Two of the most common include:

  •     Sometime before: This agreement shall automatically renew for another one (1) year term, unless either party provides notice to the other of its intent to terminate this agreement not less than thirty (30) days before the end of the then current term.
  •     Sometime within: This agreement shall automatically renew for another one (1) year term, unless either party provides notice to the other of its intent to terminate this agreement within thirty (30) days of the end of the then current term.

Evoking the first example is the easiest, since it simply involves sending notice to the other party. The second is harder, since it involves creating a calendar item and sending notice of intent not to renew within the time frame.

Based in Boston MA, LeaseQ is one of the leading providers of commercial equipment leasing and financing in the country, with options available for both small and large businesses.


Contact

  • Vernon Tirey
    LeaseQ.com
    781-346-3838
    Email
  • Darrell Ritchie

    678-860-4004
    Email