Protecting What’s Personal: Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Warn Consumers of Confusing Social Media Privacy Policies

Historically, privacy policies on social media sites have created controversy, at times even leading the Federal Trade Commission to file official complaints against companies. In his most recent article, “A Little Privacy, Please! Your Rights and Social Media Policies, ”attorney Richard P. Console, Jr., examines the troubling developments of confusing privacy policy revisions.

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If your privacy was really important, would the websites that you visit every day need to continuously revise a contract to tell you so? If social media websites really respected your privacy, would the entire policy read like fine print?

Marlton, NJ (PRWEB) April 10, 2013

Historically, privacy policies on social media sites have been considered so confusing that the Federal Trade Commission filed an official complaint against Facebook for 2009 policy changes. NBC News reported that Website privacy policies are more poorly understood by the average consumer than even credit card agreements full of fine print in the April 2012 article “Google, Facebook Privacy Policies More Confusing Than Credit Card Agreements: Survey.” More recently, Instagram attracted ire for implications that proposed privacy policy revisions may allow the site to sell user’s photographs to advertisers. For attorney Richard P. Console, Jr., of Console & Hollawell, this trend is cause for concern. After practicing law for 20 years, he believes that there is a significant difference between writing a legal document that is comprehensive and one that is simply confusing.

“If your privacy was really important, would the websites that you visit every day need to continuously revise a contract to tell you so? If social media websites really respected your privacy, would the entire policy read like fine print?” Console said. “As an attorney myself, I appreciate the importance of legal documents being thorough and precise. But it seems to me that this is a red flag. There needs to be some level of protection for the consumers as well as businesses, which means that your informed consent to share data matters. Your privacy really is important – and it’s time corporations start acting like it.”

Console examines the troubling developments of privacy policy revisions and violations in recent years in his most recent article, “A Little Privacy, Please! Your Rights and Social Media Policies.” For the sake of protecting their privacy, Console urges individuals to be proactive in reading privacy policies and to pressure social media companies to explain convoluted passages in clear ways.

Read more: http://www.consoleandhollawell.com/law-blog/a-little-privacy-please-your-rights-and-social-media-policies