Joint Aid Management (Jam) Celebrates International Year of Water 2013 With The Life-Saving Power of Water Wells

JAM proudly celebrates the International Year of Water 2013 by reflecting proudly upon one of its recent activities that brought hope to those who were in dire need of intervention and support: providing water fresh from the earth to a rural community in Africa. JAM drilled a water well at a school in a rural community within Caimbambo, a municipal area in the Benguela province of Angola.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend

(PRWEB) April 11, 2013

Standing firm in its commitment to 'Help Africa Help Itself', JAM’s water programs help curb preventable fatalities caused by water-borne diseases in Africa. According to the World Bank, an estimated 1.5 million people died globally in 2012 of such diseases.

Before the water well was drilled, the people and children of Caimambo had to walk 15.5 miles to the river to obtain water. “We suffered a lot, and it was even worse when the river dried up because sometimes it would stay dry for months,” said local resident George Dulumbia.

According to Dulumbia, “The well JAM drilled at the school has given everyone a sense of security and hope. It has also taken away the fear of contracting water borne illnesses that plague other communities without access to potable water.”

“We celebrate all the people that JAM had helped thus far and the quality of lives improved through the drilling and rehabilitation of the water wells, but there is so much more we need to do…”, stated Peter Pretorius, Founder and CEO of JAM.  

JAM’s development programs place a strong emphasis on providing water to rural communities through the drilling of new and rehabilitation of existing wells. JAM also strives to empower communities through training on issues of hygiene, the prevention of water contamination and healthy sanitation practices. This is in compliance with the Millennium Development Goals set by the United Nations.

JAM’s training is done according to the Participatory Health and Sanitation Training (PHAST) principle, in which community participation is encouraged. Communities need to help identify the problems and participate in finding solutions. This empowers communities to gain control of their own health and pass on the information from generation to generation.

About JAM

JAM is a humanitarian relief organization with over 28 years experience providing nutritional feeding within schools, assistance to orphans and vulnerable children, the provision of water and sanitation, as well as skills development, community training on agricultural development, income generation projects and HIV/AIDS programming.
Currently JAM feeds and educates over 750,000 African children every day.

Visit our website:  http://www.jamint.com/usa
Follow us on Facebook:  JAM - USA


Contact

  • Nancy Thompson
    Uptown PR
    248-496-4965
    Email