Millennium Sponsors Symposium on Personalizing Pain Care with Pharmacogenetics at the American Academy of Pain Medicine

Genetic differences may help to explain suboptimal pain control, medication interactions, adverse effects, the need for higher or lower dosing and unexpected drug test results

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Millennium PGT can help clinicians more effectively personalize pain treatment by identifying patients who may benefit from modifying the drug selection or dosing of certain prescribed opioids

San Diego, CA and Ft. Lauderdale, FL (PRWEB) April 10, 2013

The prevalence of chronic pain in the United States continues to be significant, affecting millions of patients, yet under-treatment continues to be a problem. An educational luncheon sponsored by Millennium Laboratories at the upcoming American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) Annual Meeting will introduce the clinical value of pharmacogenetic testing (PGT), a new diagnostic tool that identifies a patient’s ability to metabolize medications commonly used in pain management. The AAPM Meeting will take place April 11-14 at the Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center.

“Genetic differences may help to explain suboptimal pain control, medication interactions, adverse effects, the need for higher or lower dosing, and unexpected urine drug test results,” said Steven D. Passik, PhD, Director of Clinical Addiction Research and Education, Millennium Laboratories. “With our sponsorship of an educational session during this week’s conference, we are supporting AAPM in its efforts to provide pain physicians with updated information and new technology necessary to provide the best care for patients.”

The Millennium-sponsored symposium, titled “Personalizing Pain Care with Pharmacogenetics,” will be presented by Forest Tennant, MD; Michael J. Brennan, MD; Passik; and Jennifer Strickland, PharmD, Director of Strategy for Clinical Affairs for Millennium Laboratories on Saturday, April 13 at 12:15 p.m. in the Fort Lauderdale Convention Center-Grand Ballroom FH.

PGT results may help prescribers optimize choice of effective medication therapy while potentially minimizing side effects and drug-drug interactions. Case studies will be presented that highlight the value of pharmacogenetic testing and discuss the clinical application of an individual’s metabolism profile as it relates to personalized medication therapy.

This symposium is especially timely because millions of Americans suffer with pain on a daily basis and are not taking the proper steps to seek treatment. More than 40 million Americans suffer with chronic low back pain, more than 38 million suffer with migraine, and more than 17 million with pain associated with osteoarthritis. Millions of other Americans suffer regularly with chronic pain associated with fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis pain, cancer-related pain, post-herpetic neuralgia pain, and pain secondary to HIV or AIDS. 1,2,3,4,5,6

For more information or to register for the lunch symposium, please visit Millennium at booth #407.

About Millennium Laboratories
Millennium Laboratories is the leading research-based, clinical diagnostic company dedicated to improving the lives of people with chronic pain and/or addiction. The company provides healthcare professionals with medication monitoring, drug detection and pharmacogenetic testing services to personalize treatment plans to improve clinical outcomes and patient safety. More information can be found at http://www.millenniumlabs.com.

(1) Lethbridge-Cejku M, Rose D, Vickerie J. Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2004. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 10(228). 2006.
(2) Seget S. Pain Management: World Prescription Drug Markets. New York, NY: PJB Medical Publications; 2003. Theta Report 1217.
(3) Lipton RB et al. Neurology. 2007;68(5):343-349.
(4) Coeytaux RR, Linville JC. Headache. 2007;47(1):7-12.
(5) Weir PT et al. J Clin Rheumatol. 2006;12(3):124-128.
(6) Oxman MN et al. N Engl J Med. 2005;352(22):2271-2284.

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