Pancreatic Cancer Correlation to Type 2 Diabetes Drugs Januvia and Byetta, New Studies Find Possible Connection

d’Oliveira & Associates comments on newly released studies conducted by Alexandra Butler and Peter Butler of the University of California, Los Angeles, that may connect the Type-2 diabetes drugs Januvia and Byetta to Pancreatic Cancer.

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(PRWEB) April 23, 2013

A recently released study from the University of California, Los Angeles showed evidence of increased pre-cancerous changes in diabetic patients using “Incretin Mimetics,” a type of Type-2 Diabetes medication, in which the drugs Byetta and Januvia both belong. Incretin is a natural hormone that your body produces to assist the release of insulin to lower blood sugar. Patients with Type-2 Diabetes have problems producing that hormone. Byetta and Januvia were created to put incretin mimetics into the body to act like incretin to prompt your pancreas to release the insulin when blood sugar is low (i). Visit the website of d’Oliveira and Associates for more information about these two drugs: Byetta and Januvia.

A study conducted by Alexandra Butler and Peter Butler of the University of California, Los Angeles tested twenty individuals with diabetes and showed a 40 percent increase in pancreatic cell growth (ii). The same study found that cell damage in the people treated with the type of therapy provided from Byetta and Januvia had the potential to evolve into cancer (ii).    Public Citizen, a Washington-based public advocacy group, stated that this information is in accord with the increasing reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that there is a higher correlation between patients with pancreatic cancer and those that are using these types of drugs, as compared to other diabetes drugs (ii).

An additional study published by the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine discovered that Januvia and Byetta may double the patients’ risk of pancreatitis. The JAMA study showed that patients hospitalized with pancreatitis were twice as likely to be using Januvia or Byetta when compared to those that did not have pancreatitis. This is the first study to have solid numbers to prove the hazards of Byetta and Januvia (iii).

The FDA has been aware of the effects and how these drugs may damage the pancreas since 2009 for Januvia (iv) and since 2007 for Byetta (v). After pancreatitis caused six deaths, the FDA increased the warnings on Byetta’s drug label even though they could not determine the cause of pancreatitis in four of the death. However, the manufacturers of these drugs are still making a profit. Merck, Januvia’s manufacturer, had reported $4.1 billion in 2012 worldwide sales. Bristol-Myers, Byetta’s manufacturer reported that Byetta and its longer-acting version, Bydureon, had made $227 million in total sales in 2012 (ii).

Attorney Paul d’Oliveira stated that “I feel this new study sheds some light on whether these type 2 diabetes drugs are actually as safe as the manufacturers say they are. Hopefully this new study will force these manufacturers to take a closer look at the adverse reaction reports and consider whether these drugs should be pulled from the market.”

If after using Januvia or Byetta and find that you or someone you know has developed pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer, d'Oliveira & Associates recommends that anyone afflicted do thier research to find the best Januvia and/or Byetta lawyer you can as you may only have one chance to get justice. d'Oliveira & Associates is working with some of the more experienced dangerous durgs attorneys in the country who are filing lawsuits, and there is no fee until a settlement or award is obtained.

For a free consultation, call 1-800-992-6878 or visit their website at dmlaw.com.

Sources:
(i) http://diabetes.webmd.com/incretin-mimetics-for-type-2-diabetes
(ii) http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-03-22/diabetes-drugs-may-cause-damage-to-pancreas-study-finds.html
(iii) http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1656537#RESULTS
(iv) http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/UCM204269.pdf
(v) http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/UCM191084.pdf


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