Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) Tops 3000 Facilities in 2012

The number of facilities becoming certified to the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) increased 11 percent to surpass the 3000 mark in 2012, growing from 2,714 facilities in 2011 to 3,016 facilities in 2012, according to new data from the GOTS International Working Group. GOTS certification means consumers are purchasing items certified organic from field to finished product.

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Increasingly, consumers are demanding ecologically- and socially responsibly-processed textiles, and companies are searching for tools to make their supply chains more sustainable. The result is a ‘pull effect’ and more companies becoming GOTS-certified.

Washington, DC (PRWEB) April 23, 2013

The number of facilities becoming certified to the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) increased 11 percent to surpass the 3000 mark in 2012, growing from 2,714 facilities in 2011 to 3,016 facilities in 2012, according to new data from the GOTS International Working Group. GOTS is recognized worldwide as the leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. GOTS certification means consumers are purchasing items certified organic from field to finished product.

The Top Twenty countries in terms of the total number of GOTS-certified facilities were: India, Turkey, China, Germany, Pakistan, South Korea, Italy, Bangladesh, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Portugal, USA, Austria, Netherlands, Greece, Hong Kong, Mauritius, Peru, and Switzerland.

While the top three countries remained the same as the previous year, Germany rose to 4th place, surpassing Pakistan, and Portugal moved from 20th to 12th place by more than doubling the number of its certified facilities. In addition, companies became certified to GOTS in 5 countries with no previous GOTS-certified manufacturing (Bahrain, Colombia, Kenya, New Zealand, and Paraguay). GOTS certified facilities are now located in 62 countries around the world.

Overall, Europe led the way with a 44 percent increase in the number of GOTS-certified facilities from 2011-2012 (506-728). Countries with the greatest increase in facilities gaining GOTS certification in 2012 were (in order by rank) India, China, South Korea, Germany, Bangladesh, and Portugal.

"Increasingly, consumers are demanding ecologically- and socially responsibly-processed textiles, and companies are searching for tools to make their supply chains more sustainable. The result is a ‘pull effect’ and more companies becoming GOTS-certified," says Herbert Ladwig, GOTS Managing Director.

There are now seven regional representatives worldwide who are driving increase in the awareness of certification to GOTS. The newest representative, Shirley Han, was appointed in 2012 to focus on growing awareness of GOTS in China. With this extensive network in place, GOTS and the Soil Association in October 2012 launched the first global organic cotton campaign, asking textile industry leaders "Have you cottoned on yet?” to urge them to sign on and publicly commit to supporting organic fiber production and processing to GOTS.

Also in 2012, the GOTS operating unit changed from a limited liability corporation into a non-profit organization, the Global Standard gemeinnützige GmbH, the German legal term for a non-profit organization. While financially and organizationally GOTS has always operated as a non-profit, the external documentation has now been formalized.

Detailed information can be found in the GOTS Annual Report 2012, available for download at http://www.global-standard.org/images/stories/gots_ar2012.pdf.

ABOUT GOTS: GOTS is the stringent voluntary global standard for the entire post-harvest processing (including spinning, knitting, weaving, dyeing and manufacturing) of apparel and home textiles made with organic fiber (such as organic cotton and organic wool), and includes both environmental and social criteria. Key provisions include a ban on the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), highly hazardous chemicals (such as azo dyes and formaldehyde), and child labor, while requiring strong social compliance management systems and strict waste water treatment practices.

GOTS was developed by leading international standard setters - Organic Trade (US), Japan Organic Cotton Association, International Association Natural Textile Industry (Germany), and Soil Association (UK) which formed the GOTS International Working Group (IWG) to define globally-recognized requirements that ensure the organic status of textiles. For more information on the Global Organic Textile Standard, please see http://www.global-standard.org.


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