Washington, D.C. Receives B- on Casey Trees' Tree Report Card Canopy Assessment

Ineffective Tree Protection lowers overall grade despite increases in Tree Planting.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend
The District is now covered with more asphalt and concrete than trees. We have a lot of work to do, especially on tree protection and coordination of planting efforts, to get the most impact for the investment.

Washington, DC (PRWEB) April 26, 2013

High marks for tree planting pulled up the District’s overall grade of B- in the fifth annual Tree Report Card.

Since 2009, in conjunction with Arbor Day, Casey Trees has released an assessment of the District’s trees on public and private lands, using four performance metrics — Coverage, Health, Planting and Protection — to determine the overall grade.

Tree Protection, which evaluates the effectiveness of the Urban Forest Preservation Act (UFPA) of 2002, received an F, the same grade this category has received two of the past three years. An Incomplete was assigned last year to credit progress being made on the Urban Forestry Administration Reorganization Act (UFARA) of 2011. The current iteration of UFARA is tabled in the D.C. Council’s Committee on Transportation and the Environment.

The addition of 10,404 trees on D.C. lands in 2012 earned a Tree Planting grade of an A+ for the third year in a row. Tree Health remained the same as last year with a B- grade. Despite a drop in canopy from 38 to 26 percent between 2006 and 2011 that was uncovered in a re-analysis of existing data, Tree Coverage received an A- grade. Details are described in the complete report.

“This year’s Tree Report Card poses challenging questions about our collective stewardship of D.C.’s trees,” said Mark Buscaino, Executive Director of Casey Trees. “Mayor Gray’s leadership with the Sustainable DC Plan affirmed D.C.’s tree canopy goal and while tree planting remains strong, tree canopy continues to decline. The District is now covered with more asphalt and concrete than trees. We have a lot of work to do, especially on tree protection and coordination of planting efforts, to get the most impact for the investment.”

Buscaino and Dr. Jessica Sanders, Director of Technical Services and Research, will discuss the latest Tree Report Card live during Tree Talk, Casey Trees’ online chat series, on April 26 at 10:00 a.m. Participants can submit questions or comments live during the chat or in advance to friends(at)caseytrees(dot)org.

The 2012 Tree Report Card and those from previous years may be viewed in their entirety at caseytrees.org/treereportcard.

###

About Casey Trees:
Casey Trees is a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization established in 2002 committed to restoring, enhancing and protecting the tree canopy of the nation’s capital. To learn more about Casey Trees, visit http://www.caseytrees.org.


Contact

Follow us on: Contact's Facebook Contact's Twitter