Fear of Brain Injury Shouldn’t End Sports: Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Stand Up Against Sports Bans for Safety Reasons

In recent months, sports-related brain injuries have made headlines nationwide, in part because of concerning new information regarding the long-term severity of head injuries. In his latest article, “Cutting off Your Nose to Protect Your Head: Banning Sports Is Not the Only Answer to Preventing Brain Injuries,” attorney Richard P. Console, Jr., urges researchers and the sports industry to consider other ways to prevent or reduce the amount of sports-related brain injuries rather than banning sports like football and boxing entirely.

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While I’ve seen firsthand how brain injury makes the lives of victims unrecognizable, I believe that the big-picture losses of brain injuries have little to do with the images that can be seen on CT scan or MRI results.

Marlton, NJ (PRWEB) April 26, 2013

In recent months, sports-related brain injuries have made headlines nationwide, in part because of concerning new information regarding the long-term severity of head injuries, The Wall Street Journal reported on March 13, 2013, in “More Sobering Findings on Head Trauma.” Football and boxing have taken center stage in the debate over whether brain injury risks should inspire a ban on these sports. The issue has attorney Richard P. Console, Jr., taking a stand that many may not expect from 20-year safety advocate.

“The side supporting the ban makes a compelling argument with a deeply emotional appeal, sharing stories of loved ones devastated by brain injuries,” Console said. “While I’ve seen firsthand how brain injury makes the lives of victims unrecognizable, I believe that the big-picture losses of brain injuries have little to do with the images that can be seen on CT scan or MRI results. The decrease in physical and cognitive abilities cripples a victim’s opportunity to live a full life – a life that consists of all of the things that individual enjoyed doing before the injury occurred, sports included. When we insist that the only way to decrease the number of head injuries is to ban sports entirely, we ignore many other factors that impact safety.”

In his latest article, “Cutting off Your Nose to Protect Your Head: Banning Sports Is Not the Only Answer to Preventing Brain Injuries,” Console urges researchers and the sports industry to consider other ways to prevent or reduce the amount of sports-related brain injuries. One solution to the problem is to study how concussions occur and develop new protective gear and technologies to detect brain injuries. Console reminds readers that, while sports can cause brain injuries and the subject is important to talk about, sports are not a leading cause of injuries.

Read more: http://www.consoleandhollawell.com/law-blog/cutting-off-your-nose-to-protect-your-head-banning-sports-is-not-the-only-answer-to-preventing-brain-injuries