The Latest Anthropology & Archaeology Research Featured at Sciences Social Network

ScienceIndex.com has just added the Anthropology and Archaeology Sciences to its' Society category. While the site currently contains a total of over 1,441,630 posts, these two new sections contain 4,924 articles derived partly through monitoring nearly 165 scientific journals publishing in these two research disciplines.

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Social Sciences @ ScienceIndex.com

Social Sciences

Anthropology & Archaeology @ ScienceIndex.com

Mannheim, Germany (PRWEB) April 30, 2013

ScienceIndex.com is a Society Sciences Social Network newly featuring the latest Anthropology and Archaeology Research. The site was established in 1998 to index the very latest news, headlines, references and resources from science journals, books and websites worldwide. The site covers news in all fields of biology, business, chemistry, engineering, geography, health, mathematics and society. In the field of Society Sciences, the site has now included the two new categories Anthropology and Archaeology. While the Anthropology section covers the origins, physical and cultural development, biological characteristics, and social customs and beliefs of humankind, the Archaeology section deals with historic or prehistoric peoples and their cultures by analysis of their artifacts, inscriptions, monuments, and other such remains.

ScienceIndex.com's Society Research Category covers the totality of social relationships among humans. Its twelve sections include anthropology, archaeology, arts, education, family, history, law and crime, linguistics, literature, philosophy, politics, and religion. Users can receive alerts for newly published content in this category by subscribing to ScienceIndex.com's Society Sciences RSS feed.

ScienceIndex.com's new Anthropology Research section covers the origins, physical and cultural development, biological characteristics, and social customs and beliefs of humankind. It currently contains 2,413 articles partly derived from over 100 scientific Anthropology journals. The latest articles in this category are also available through an Anthropology Research RSS feed. One of the latest additions to this section covers the making of the Vietnamese ethnographic film "Drums on the Red River". The article examines the history of ethnographic film in Vietnam and the adoption of a new investigative philosophy resulting in a new investigative approach enables the gathering of anthropological insight. Another article investigates the role of shellfish in hunter–gatherer societies during the Early Upper Palaeolithic. This investigation of the El Cuco rockshelter in northern Spain demonstrates that marine resources were systematically used at least from the beginning of the Upper Palaeolithic in the region and that intensive shellfish gathering did not occur until the end of this period.

ScienceIndex.com's new Archaeology section deals with historic or prehistoric peoples and their cultures by analysis of their artifacts, inscriptions, monuments, and other such remains. It currently contains over 2,830 articles partly derived from 63 scientific Archaeology journals. The latest articles in this section are also available through an Archaeology Research RSS feed. One recently included article in this section covers the taphonomy of color in fossil insects and feathers. Recent studies on structural and pigmentary colors in fossil insects and feathers have illuminated important aspects of the anatomy, taphonomy, evolution and function of color in fossils. The authors of this article strengthen that future archeological studies will need to resolve outstanding questions regarding the taphonomy of color and will enhance our ability to infer original coloration and its functions in fossil insects and theropods. Another article in this section covers the dynamics of mangrove ecosystems, changes in sea level and the strategies of Neolithic settlements along the coast of Oman between 6000–3000 BC, integrating the dynamics of mangroves, lagoons and deltas, with sea-level change and the evidence from Neolithic shell middens. The authors consider the mid-Holocene sea-level highstand stability to be an optimum period for mangrove development which can be correlated with Neolithic sites around the mangroves. Their decline since 3000-2500 BC and further degradation is mainly attributed to the prevailing arid climate that reduced summer monsoon effects in the tropical area by favoring the extension of sabkhas.

The Sciences Social Network currently contains over 1.44 million posts distributed among its' 75 categories. 92,553 users monitor over 15,100 journals publishing within the scope of the site. Due to an continuously improved publishing process, the delay between original publication and appearance at ScienceIndex.com is now no more than three hours. The site provides an advanced search feature which suggests up to ten closely related articles for a search and for every displayed post.


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Social Sciences @ ScienceIndex.com Social Sciences

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Anthropology @ ScienceIndex.com Anthropology

Anthropology @ ScienceIndex.com


Archaeology @ ScienceIndex.com Archaeology

Archaeology @ ScienceIndex.com