Medicaid Expert Says Florida's Failure to Accept Federal Funding to Cover More People Will Harm Families, Hospitals and Businesses

Georgetown University researchers estimate that Florida could have saved as much as $100 million a year because expanded Medicaid coverage would have reduced the financial costs of other state-supported safety net programs and the new coverage would have been financed almost entirely by the federal government.

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Joan Alker, Georgetown University Center for Children and Families

Uninsured Floridians will have to continue to go without access to preventive and primary care that would accompany Medicaid coverage and will continue to show up in the ER as they have nowhere else to turn. This is not a wise use of taxpayer dollars.

Washington, DC (PRWEB) May 03, 2013

Despite a strong effort by several Florida organizations, the Florida Legislature headed toward adjournment without passing legislation that would allow the state to accept federal funding to offer coverage to more uninsured Floridians through Medicaid. Florida has more uninsured adults than any other state but Texas.

National Medicaid expert, Joan Alker of Georgetown University's Center for Children and Families, said it was disappointing that "ideology trumped pragmatism" in the Medicaid debate in Florida as research has shown that accepting the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid option would have helped the state's uninsured residents, hospitals, businesses and the state's bottomline.

"Florida’s hospitals will continue to face mounting unpaid medical bills from uninsured patients who would have been covered if the House had accepted the compromise plan approved by the Senate," said Alker, who has spent over ten years studying Florida's Medicaid program. "Research has also found that many of the businesses that anchor Florida’s economy will be put at a competitive disadvantage by the failure to act as they will face higher payments for uninsured workers”

Georgetown University Center for Children and Families and Health Policy Institute researchers estimated that 800,000 to 1.3 million uninsured Floridians would gain health coverage if the state accepted the Medicaid option.

The Center for Children and Families (CCF) of the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute is an independent, nonpartisan policy & research center dedicated to expanding & improving health care coverage for America’s children and families


Contact

  • Cathy Hope
    Georgetown University Center on Health Insurance Reforms
    202-687-7651
    Email

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