Botox Injections – Do They Impact Mood?

A recent study from researchers at Cardiff University examines the impact of Botox injections on patients' moods. Dr. Simon Ourian of Epione Beverly Hills says that the conclusions of the study are not borne out by his clinical experience.

Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) May 07, 2013

As reported in an article entitled “Treating Laughter Lines Leaves Patients Feeling More Depressed” on the Cardiff University website on April 11, 2013 (Go to goo.gl/LoQ9b), in addition to treating fine lines and wrinkles, Botox injections can even affect one’s mood. However, the chemicals in Botox do nothing to affect whether one feels happy or sad. Instead, the key lies in the muscles that form one’s facial expressions.

“I appreciate that the article is only a recap of the study’s findings and maybe a review of the study in its entirety would make me rethink my position, but I believe that my patients are generally happy after receiving Botox injections. This is simply because, in my opinion, they feel better about how they look and that they’ve done something nice for themselves,” says Dr. Simon Ourian, Medical Director of Epione Beverly Hills.

According to the report, psychologists have found that facial expressions are extremely important for controlling depression and happiness. If one is constantly smiling, neurotransmitters associated with the feelings of happiness are sent to the brain. In contrast, people who frown all the time are sending negative neurotransmitters that bring down their mood.

Further according to the report, Botox injections have the most impact on one’s mood when injected into frown lines. Botox smooths the outward appearance of this area by relaxing the muscles. This prevents the patient from making sad facial expression when they are in a negative mood. According to psychologists, this actually leaves patients feeling less depressed and in a better mood than they were without the injections.

“Interestingly,” says Dr. Ourian, “the article notes that Botox used for crows' feet has the opposite effect on patients, causing them to feel more depressed.” Crows' feet are the sagging muscles underneath the eyes, which can be lifted by small Botox injections. Unfortunately, the eyes use these muscles when forming a smile, so relaxing them can reduce the strength of the smile, thereby increasing the chance of depression.

“This isn’t the first report of its kind that I’ve seen recently,” says Dr. Ourian, “and I just don’t see the negative impact from Botox injections that they claim.”

Dr. Ourian has been a pioneer in laser technology and non-invasive aesthetic procedures including Restylane, Juvéderm, Radiesse and Sculptra. These treatments are used for the correction or reversal of a variety of conditions such as acne, acne scars, skin discoloration, wrinkles, stretch marks, varicose veins, cellulite, and others. More information about the impact of Botox on mood can be found on Epione’s website.


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