Brandith Irwin, MD, Shares Melasma Secrets in a Recent Blog Entry on Cosmetic Dermatology Website, SkinTour.com

Cosmetic dermatologist, Dr. Brandith Irwin, shares treatment information on Melasma, a hormonal pigment condition triggered by light in women.

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Dr. Brandith Irwin

Sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen! You will not have success treating melasma if you don’t block light. Every time ultraviolet light hits these brown spots it makes them worse, that's why your sunscreen must block UVA as well as UVB.

Seattle, WA (PRWEB) May 10, 2013

Every week, cosmetic dermatologist Brandith Irwin, MD, answers questions about skin care conditions, treatments and products from readers of her website, SkinTour.com. One of the questions Dr. Irwin answered this week provides information on melasma, a common issue in women.

Melasma is the brown splotchiness on the forehead, cheeks, upper lip, or jaw line that is triggered by hormones and light. While hormones stimulate the growth of cells that make brown pigment, natural light stimulates the production of even more brown pigment or melanin. According to Dr. Irwin, "You really have two problems, too many cells making brown pigment and light constantly stimulating those cells resulting in too much dark pigment."

Melasma usually shows up as brown spots or splotches on the forehead, cheeks, jaw line or upper lip. Especially common in women that are undergoing hormonal changes such as pregnancy, menopause, or even taking birth control, melasma can be difficult to treat once it gets started. If you think you may have signs of melasma, Dr. Irwin suggests your first step is finding a qualified dermatologist.

The most important tip from Dr. Irwin for women at home is, "Sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen! You will not have success treating melasma if you don’t block light. Every time ultraviolet light hits these brown spots it makes them worse, that's why your sunscreen must block UVA as well as UVB." In addition to using certain types of UVA and UVB blocking sunscreens, she suggests that you double-up on the areas that have the most blotches with a mineral pigment sunscreen makeup like Colorescience, and finally, wear a hat.

Bleaching creams, microdermabrasion, and light peels can also help reduce discoloration. "If you are considering a laser treatment for melasma, it is imperative you see a dermatologist who is an expert with laser treatments because many lasers will actually make melasma worse," explains Dr. Irwin.

Unlike most prominent dermatologists, Brandith Irwin, MD has no financial ties to any skin care manufacturer or laser company. She does not sit on any boards, act as a spokesperson, accept any fees, or endorse any line of cosmetics. She is a board-certified dermatologist who practices in Seattle, WA, at the practice she founded, Madison Skin & Laser Center. Additionally, she has published multiple anti-aging books, the most recent titled, “The Surgery-Free Makeover: All You Need To Know For Great Skin And A Younger Face.”

SkinTour.com has quickly become a highly sought out source for cosmetic dermatology and skincare product information for women on the Internet. Serving as an unbiased skincare and beauty resource, dermatologist Dr. Irwin not only provides women with expert articles on cosmetic treatments and skincare product information, she also answers questions from users to help them get the most out of their skincare treatments. For more information please visit http://www.SkinTour.com.


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