An Aspirin a Day May Take One’s Hearing Away

Aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen are the most commonly used drugs for pain control. Dr. J G Moellendorf, DC, ND, LCP discusses recent research from the audiology profession about increased hearing loss with analgesic use.

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Regular use of analgesics, specifically aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen, might increase the risk of adult hearing loss, particularly in younger individuals.

Sturgeon Bay, WI (PRWEB) May 14, 2013

Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin Chiropractor and Naturopath, Dr. J G Moellendorf, DC, ND, LCP notes that while aspirin has been known for decades to cause ringing in the ears, stomach ulcers,and kidney problems, doctors are concerned that aspirin and other analgesics (pain relievers) are causing loss of sight and hearing.

The Journal of the American Medical Association published Long-Term Use of Aspirin and Age-Related Macular Degeneration in December, 2012. Barbara Klein’s research team at the University of Wisconsin followed residents of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin for 20 years. Participants taking aspirin at least twice weekly had a 71% increase in macular degeneration 10 years later. The Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine published The Association of Aspirin Use With Age-Related Macular Degeneration in February, 2013. The research team led by Gerald Liew at the University of Sydney (Australia) found that the incidence of macular degeneration was about 2.5 times greater at 5, 10, and 15 years among regular aspirin users compared to non-users. Knowing the damages aspirin can cause to the eyes, doctors are concerned that it may also damage hearing.

The research team led by Dr. Sharon Curhan at Boston’s Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital has studied the causes of hearing loss for over 25 years. A connection was found between analgesic use and hearing loss. They published their results as Analgesic Use and the Risk of Hearing Loss in Women in the September 2012 issue of American Journal of Epidemiology. Prefacing their findings, the researchers note that over 36 million Americans have hearing loss. More than 50% of Americans over 60 years are affected; with 33% of those between 40 and 49 already have hearing loss. They are concerned that even mild hearing loss compromises the ability to understand speech with background noise or several people talking. They are apprehensive that this can lead to social isolation, depression, and a poorer quality of life.

Curhan’s team followed 62261 women between 31 and 48 years between 1995 and 2009. Among those using ibuprofen 2 to 3 times per week, there was a 13% increase in hearing loss compared to non-users. Those using ibuprofen 4 to 5 times weekly had a 21% increase of hearing loss, and those with a frequency of 6 or more times weekly had a 24% increase. Among those using acetaminophen, there were increases of 11%, 21%, and 8% respectively. Those consuming aspirin showed no significant increases in hearing loss.

Curhan’s research team did an earlier study on men titled Analgesic Use and the Risk of Hearing Loss in Men published in The American Journal of Medicine. A group of 26917 men aged 40 to 74 were followed at two year intervals between 1986 and 2004. Regular users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) under 50 years old were 61% more likely to develop hearing loss, while ages 50 to 59 were 32% more likely, and those over 60 had an increase of 16% compared to non-users. Of those regularly using acetaminophen, those under 50 years had a 99% higher chance of hearing losses, those 50 to 59 had a 38% increase, and those over 60 were increased 16%. Regular users of aspirin younger than 60 years old had a 33% increased incidence of hearing loss, though no increases were seen beyond 60 years.

Dr. Curhan’s concludes: “Regular use of analgesics, specifically aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen, might increase the risk of adult hearing loss, particularly in younger individuals. Given the high prevalence of regular analgesic use and health and social implications of hearing impairment, this represents an important public health issue.”

Considering these findings, Dr. Moellendorf advises that it would be better to use aspirin for occasional minor pain control rather than ibuprofen or acetaminophen. For chronic pain control, other alternatives such as Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D should be investigated, along with finding and caring for the underlying cause(s) of the pain.

Additional information about Chiropractic, Naturopathy, and other forms of natural health care has been provided by Moellendorf Chiropractic Office, Ltd. at http://www.all-about-wellness.com. Using the latest research findings, Moellendorf Chiropractic Office, Ltd. uses a comprehensive package of Chiropractic care, decompression traction therapy, active therapeutic movement training, cold laser therapy, and natural nutrition for the natural treatment of neurological conditions and pain without drugs or surgery.

About: Dr. J G Moellendorf, DC, ND, LCP
Dr. J G Moellendorf, DC, ND, LCP attended the University of Wisconsin—Superior where he majored in Physics and Mathematics, with a minor in art photography. While attending the University of Minnesota—Minneapolis, he assisted in research on ribosomal proteins. Completing his Chiropractic studies at Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa, he graduated Cum Laude (with high honors) in 1983. He started Moellendorf Chiropractic Office, Ltd. in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin in 1983. In 1996, Dr. Moellendorf was awarded his Doctorate in Naturopathy from Trinity School of Natural Health. In 2001, he received Chiropractic’s most prestigious award, the honorary Legion of Chiropractic Philosophers degree, for his thesis “The Workings of Innate Intelligence in Obsessive/Compulsive and Addictive Behaviors.” This paper was chosen for publishing in the book Philosophic Contemplations vol. 2 in 2002. In June of 2012, Dr. Moellendorf authored his first book titled Healthcare’s Best Kept Secret which can be ordered on Amazon. Dr. Moellendorf can be contacted by phone (920) 493-2126, fax (920) 743-1145, email jgmoellendorf(at)itol(dot)com, his website at http://www.all-about-wellness.com, or send a carrier pigeon to 44.84722N and 87.36416W.


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