Al-Anon Helps Families Recover from the Impacts of a Loved One’s Drinking

In a new podcast from Al-Anon Family Groups, three Al-Anon members explain how discouragement and despair about a loved one’s drinking turned into hope, peace of mind, and a new way of life.

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Strength and hope for friends and families of problem drinkers

Al-Anon Family Groups

Al-Anon showed me there were a lot of other things more important that I should be looking at. It took some time, though, for me to realize that I had been affected, that it wasn’t all about my mom.

Virginia Beach, VA (PRWEB) May 16, 2013

The Twelve Steps of Al-Anon can be a journey of self-discovery and renewal for families and friends of problem drinkers. Newcomers often attend Al-Anon Family Groups in a sincere attempt to make a loved one stop drinking. Gradually they recognize the impacts that a loved one’s drinking has had on them and their family. They begin to see some of the improvements that are possible in the quality of their lives, whether their loved one continues to drink or not.

In a new podcast from Al-Anon Family Groups, “Using Step Five,” three anonymous Al-Anon members tell how their loved one’s alcoholism affected them. They explain how discouragement and despair turned into hope, peace of mind, and a new way of life. The Step Five podcast is available at Al-Anon.org under the category, “Using Al-Anon’s Steps in Our Personal Lives.”

Anonymity is an important principle of the Al-Anon program. Lois, Tom, and Marsha describe the process they went through to acquire peace of mind for themselves and compassion for their loved ones. Their stories are typical of many relatives and friends of problem drinkers.

Lois shared some of her emotions associated with growing up with two alcoholic parents. “I had so much shame. I had so much anger and rage. I didn’t understand what happened.”

Tom came to Al-Anon because of his mother’s drinking. He was determined to find a way to make her stop. “Al-Anon showed me there were a lot of other things more important that I should be looking at,” Tom said. “It took some time, though, for me to realize that I had been affected, that it wasn’t all about my mom.”

Marsha came to Al-Anon because of her husband’s drinking. “I could not figure out what I needed to do to get him to stop drinking,” Marsha said. “I thought, of course, that it was his problem, not mine. If he would go somewhere to take care of his problem, then we would be okay.”

Al-Anon Family Groups are for friends and families who have been affected by the problem drinking of someone close to them. Nearly 16,000 local groups meet every week throughout the U.S., Canada, Bermuda, and Puerto Rico. Al-Anon Family Groups meet in more than 130 countries, and Al-Anon literature is available in more than 40 languages. Al-Anon Family Groups have been offering strength and support to families and friends of alcoholics since 1951. Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc., also known as the World Service Office, acts as the clearinghouse worldwide for inquiries from those who need help or want information about Al-Anon Family Groups and Alateen, its program for teenage members.

For more information about Al-Anon Family Groups, go to Al-Anon.Alateen.org, or read a copy of "Al-Anon Faces Alcoholism 2013." Find a local meeting by calling toll-free: 1-888-4AL-ANON, Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. ET.