Scambook Warns New Graduates About Fake Job Listings

As summer begins so does the job hunt for new college graduates, and Scambook, the Internet’s leading complaint resolution platform, is issuing a warning about fraudulent job listings on popular employment websites such as CareerBuilder, LinkedIn and Craigslist.

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There are many job listings sites, like Craigslist, where anyone can claim to be a staffer for an employment agency. Scam artists create fake job listings as a way to gather a job seeker's personal information for fraudulent purposes.

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) June 05, 2013

As summer begins so does the job hunt for new college graduates, and Scambook, the Internet’s leading complaint resolution platform, is issuing a warning about fraudulent job listings on popular employment websites such as CareerBuilder, LinkedIn and Craigslist.

"There are many job listings sites, like Craigslist, where anyone can claim to be a staffer for an employment agency. Scam artists create fake job listings as a way to gather a job seeker's personal information for fraudulent purposes," said Kase Chong, Scambook’s Director of Marketing.

“They may also exploit eager graduates, many of whom are facing large student loan debts, with a variety of 'get rich quick' schemes such as fraudulent secret shopper or work-from-home fulfillment positions," Chong added.

Scambook members have issued over 200 complaints against fake employment agencies such as First Premiere Staffing, and Wellman Careers & Partners. Those seeking employment online received automated responses from these companies' hiring assistants or human resources. The job seeker is then asked to complete an online application form requiring a Social Security number and/or credit card number.

Registering with a fraudulent employment agency can result in lost money or even identity theft. Therefore, Scambook is issuing these exclusive tips to help detect false job listings when hunting for a new career:

1. Look for companies using the keywords “recruitment,” “careers,” “partners” and “staffing.” Although not all companies who use these keywords are fraudulent, Scambook members have identified a variety of fake employers who rely on these official sounding terms to promote their "business."

2. Watch out for employment offers that seem too good to be true, and HR representatives who are too eager to hire. If a “staffing assistant” praises experience and job history, make sure this praise refers to actual past employment or skills on the job seeker's resume. Job seekers are also advised to be extremely careful of any "employer" willing to hire without an initial phone or in-person interview. This is a significant red flag for a job scam.

3. If a potential employer requires a Social Security Number in an online application, or they demand credit card info to perform a background or credit check, don’t do it. A legitimate employer may need this private information eventually, but they will ask for it after the employee has been hired or attended a few rounds of interviews. Be extra cautious if the information is requested in an unsolicited email.

4. If job seekers have difficulty determining whether an employment offer is real or a scam, ask questions about the position. Be specific. If the offer comes from a real employer, they will be impressed by the initiative to learn more about the company. If the job offer is fraudulent, they will answer with vague answers that don’t make any sense or they will simply ignore the job seeker's questions.

5. "Pre-approved" job offers that arrive out of the blue, via email or unsolicited phone call, are likely to be fraudulent. Job seekers should be on the alert for any employment offers for a position they did not apply for, especially if the offer meets any criteria from Tip #2. Any job offer that does not address the candidate by name should also be regarded with suspicion.

For more information about specific types of job scams and additional tips, consumers are invited to visit http://www.scambook.com/blog

ABOUT SCAMBOOK
Scambook is an online complaint resolution platform dedicated to obtaining justice for victims of fraud with unprecedented speed and accuracy. By building communities and providing resources on the latest scams, Scambook arms consumers with the up-to-date information they need to stay on top of emerging schemes. Since its inception, Scambook has resolved over $10 million in reported consumer damages. For more information, visit scambook.com.


Contact

  • Judy Dixon
    PMBC Group
    (310) 777-7546
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