Apollo Financial Group Says No To Government Spying

Wall Street firm Apollo Financial Group announced today that it does not support mass government surveillance of Americans or pass on personal data to spy agencies.

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New York, NY (PRWEB) June 11, 2013

Wall Street firm Apollo Financial Group announced today that it does not support mass government surveillance of Americans or pass on personal data to spy agencies.

This week leaks on U.S. surveillance and spying activities by high profile agencies has caused an uproar from the public with many sizable companies reportedly creating secret backdoors to feed data to the NSA, FBI and others.

The leak reportedly fed to the Guardian and Washington Post by former NSA contractor and CIA employee Edward Snowden who has now checked out of his Hong Kong hotel has caused many to reconsider whom they will do business with.

Among the largest firms that the report claims the government was screening from data include Facebook, Apple, Google and Yahoo as well as telecom giant Verizon. Some have suggested backdoors and secret rooms were established for requesting, scanning and transferring this data.

While no claims have been made that any major financial firms have been involved in this scandal New York’s Apollo Financial Group has been the first in the industry to step up and confirm that is does not have a backdoor made for government surveillance, does not directly pass on or sell any information to any government or government agency or other third party.

Apollo Financial Group is one of the country’s most active distressed debt experts that specialize in investing in and brokering mortgage notes. The firm acquires, modifies and sells non-performing first and second lien mortgage notes, facilitates private lending and has made big strides into the education field with a series of live seminars on note investing across the U.S. The company is adamant that is does not in any way provide access to or pass on data on clients, lenders, borrowers it works with to any third parties.

While the debate continues to rage about how to find balance between security and protecting Americans versus protecting their privacy and avoiding becoming a big brother state some have begun to question whether they should pull back from engaging on social platforms. However, the damage is already done and individuals lack the ability to go back and scrub their virtual histories.

Despite the recent clamor in the media surrounding the privacy concerns that this scandal has alerted the public to, senior executives at Apollo Financial Group continue to be active social media users themselves.
In response to the events CEO and Founder of Apollo, Dean Anastos says that “While many individuals may feel that the government has been too intrusive on the domestic front recently, most organizations should already be doing a lot more to protect the privacy and security of the personal data they hold”. He went on to say that providing users aren’t involved in criminal activity, or are on the run from the FBI they shouldn’t have any reason to pull back from social media. In fact, Mr. Anastos points out that besides being great for business, both Facebook and Twitter have proven powerful tools for doing a significant amount of good and spreading the message of positive initiatives that can help build up local communities.

For further comment on current security concerns and their potential role in the financial industry or to discover how Apollo Financial Group is using social media to make a difference visit http://apollofinancialgrp.com or follow Apollo’s Senior Partner @ Ricky Brava on Twitter.


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